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Full text of "Kaleidoscope"

FOR REFERENCE 

Not to be taken iron) this mm 




13467.- 



FOR REFERENCE 
Not to be taken from this room. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/kaleidoscope1978hamp 



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Published by the Students of 
Hampden-Sydney College and 
Hunter Publishing Company, 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 27103 



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COLLEGE LIBRARY 

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J Ms book has no message and no 
M. I have made an effort to portray 
entire year with as few biases as pos- 
le job of the yearbook editor is to 
h many unrelated things and to 
"'iem all. Even in a school as 
', it is difficult 
omeone may 
joked by this 
tional. 

I 1977 GAL- 

AR, and the 

ideas which 

i them dur- 

'ress Con- 



Louis Holgate and Steve Tedesco. 

their various efforts to help in any 

way possible, 
Howard Rodman, who always pi 

duced when necessary. 
Paul Smith, for his constructive crit. 

cism. 
Bill Darden. who always seems to 

show up when needed, 
John Perry, for his understanding and 

for not saying "I told you so"'. 
Teri, who understood when I some-f 

times put the yearbook before her. 



assays, because 
ng a select few ' 



JAM. JR. 





For his devotion to Hampden-Sydney College, 
For his helpfulness throughout the year, 
For the tremendous job he has done as the 

Dean of Students, 
We proudly dedicate the KALEIDOSCOPE to 

Thomas H. Shomo, 



truly a progressive, innovative man in a 
traditional school. 






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^Baard of STra&teess 








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John A. Field, Jr., LL.D. 
William C. Finch, Ph.D. 
Herbert W. Jackson, III 
Mrs. William T. Reed, Jr. 
James L. Trinkle 
Joseph T. Trotter 
Richard M. Venable, Jr. 
Royal E. Cabell, Jr. 
S. Douglas Fleet, Chairman 
Albert R. Gillespie, M.D. 
C. Randolph Hudgins, Jr. 
Robert W. Lawson, Jr. 
Alton W. Whitehouse, Jr. 
Lewis G. Chewning, LL.D. 
Charles J. Geyer, Jr., Ph.D. 
Richard A. Michaux, M.D. 
William M. Passano, Jr. 



Benjamin A. Soyars 

George E. Taylor 

Donald A. Tollefson 

W. Cecil Carpenter 

George B. Cartledge, Jr. 

J. Bruce James 

Sherwood E. Liles, Jr. 

Mrs. William E. McBratney, Jr. 

Henry C. Spalding, Jr. 

William F. Spotswood 

Bernard E. Bain, D.D. 

T. Kyle Baldwin 

William R. Hill, Jr. 

Peter A. Leggett 

John B. Long 

William R. Middelthon, Jr. 

Gordon C. Willis 



12 




l&esu/eyifr ( ^o&aiA ^Baatlri^/, 3ffl5^ 




It is the presumption of those who 
teach in a college dedicated to the pursuit 
of excellence in liberal studies that those 
studies have a time-worn and proven fit- 
ness for preparing their students to think 
better: by this we mean nothing more 
than you learn to assemble evidence pa- 
tiently and thoroughly before you make 



decisions and judgements; that you learn 
courageously to uphold those decisions 
and judgements; that you be prepared to 
argue them eloquently; that your minds 
be free of prejudice; that you learn to 
appreciate arguments and points-of-view 
opposed to your own, for in them is often 
more truth than in your own; and that 



you will esteem both the lifelong cultiva- 
tion of the mind and the gift of that mind, 
and the character that sustains it, and the 
willingness to place these at the service 
of others, as your highest calling; finally 
that the heart has its reasons which the 
mind cannot comprehend. 



13 





James O. Avison 

Vice President for 

Institutional Development 



Dr. George Bagby 
English 




14 




B. Calvin Bass 
Chemistry & Physics 



Dr. L. Neel Beard 
Physics 



Richard S. Benner 

Director of Counseling 

& Career Planning 



Dr. William F. Bliss 
History 



Thomas D. Bondurant 

Asst. Business Manager 

& Treasurer 



John L. Brinkley 

Classics 

Clerk of the Faculty 




15 








Richard A. Burrell 
Athletics 



Gerald T. Carney 
Bible & Religion 



R.B. Lee Carter 
Admissions 



Edward A. Crawford 
Biology 



Dr. T. Edward Crawley 

English 

Glee Club Director 



Harrison L. DeLancy 
Natural Sciences 




16 








Dr. Thomas E. DeWolfe 
Psychology 



Does man ever tire of playing with "Lincoln 
Logs"? 



Dr. Merrill A. Espigh 

Registrar 

Mathematics 



Dr. Alan F. Farrell 
Modern Languages 



Dr. Keith W. Fitch 
History 




17 





Gustav H. Franke 
Mathematics 



J. Stokeley Fulton 
Athletic Director 



Dr. Stanley R. Gemborys 
Biology 



Dr. Joseph E. Goldberg 
Government & Foreign Affairs 



Eleanor M. Grier 
Acquisitions Librarian 



Paul L. Grier 
Librarian 





18 




Robert B. Harris 
Economics 



Dr. Ronald L. Heinemann 
History 



Sandra W. Heinemann 
Catalogue Librarian 



Dr. William R. Hendley 
Economics 



James F. Hilliard 
Development Officer 



Dr. David C. Holly 

Government & Foreign Affairs 




19 




Dr. Robert T. Hubbard, Jr. 
Government & Foreign Affairs 



Dr. Vincent A. Iverson 
Philosophy 



Dr. Paul A. Jagasich 
Modern Languages 



Professor Laine keeps another unprepared student 
after class. 



20 





Dr. W. Thomas Joyner 
Physics 



Dr. Edward M. Kiess 
Physics 



Victor G. Kriss 
Physics 



Dr. Amos Lee Laine 
History 



Dr. Robert W. Leiby 
Chemistry 



Dr. Anne C. Lund 
Biology 





21 




David E. Marion 
Government & Foreign Affairs 



Dr. Lawrence H. Martin 
English 



Elna Ann Mayo 

Assistant Reference & 

Series Librarian 



Dr. Thomas T. Mayo, IV 
Physics 



Dr. Richard C. McClintock 

Communications Assistant 

Classics 



Dr. Paul Mercken 
Classics & Philosophy 





22 




Dr. Moses S. Musoke 
Economics 



Howard Myers, Jr. 
Athletics 



Dr. Owen L. Norment, Jr. 
Bible & Religion 



Thomas J. O'Grady 
English 



Dr. Donald R. Ortner 

Psychology 
College Psychologist 



*>%Nja '"**-§<< 




23 





Dr. William W. Porterfield 
Chemistry 



Rev. John B. Rice 
College Chaplain 



Dr. Robert G. Rogers 
Bible & Religion 



Dr. Joseph Rubenstein 
Psychology 



Dr. Jack P. Sanders 
Mathematics 



Dr. Mary M. Saunders 
English 





24 





Bobby G. Saylor 
Asst. Athletic Director 



Dr. Brian E. Schrag 
Philosophy 



Dr. George M. Schurr 
Dean of the Faculty 



Dr. William A. Schear 
Biology 











Martin M. Sherrod 
Director of Communications 



Thomas H. Shomo 
Acting Dean of Students 
Director of Financial Aid 



Dr. Jorge A. Silveira 
Modern Languages 



Dr. Frank J. Simes 
Psychology 



Dr. Gilman Z. Simms 
Athletics 



Dr. James Y. Simms 
History 






26 




Dr. Hassell A. Simpson 
English 



Dr. Herbert J. Sipe, Jr. 
Chemistry 



Dr. Herbert B. Skerry 
Mathematics 



Reginald G. Smith 
Chemistry 



Dr. Frank J. Spreng 
Economics 



Margaret W. Swartz 
Alumni Director 




27 





V 



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W. Bruce Swartz 
Assoc. Director of Admissions 



Don P. Thompson 
Athletics 



Dr. Douglas S. Thompson 
Chemistry 



Dr. Graves H. Thompson 
Classics 






28 




Dr. C. Wayne Tucker 
Classics 



Dr. Tully H. Turney 
Biology 



Louis A. Wacker 
Athletics 



John H. Waters 
Director of Admissions 



Dr. Joseph W. Whitted 
Modem Languages 



Dr. Alan F. Zoellner 
Reference Librarian 





29 




i 





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L 
A 

S 

s 

E 

S 



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encor& 




32 





William Lewis Abbott 
B.A. History 



John William Allan, Jr. 
B.A. Bible & Religion 



Alvan Macauley Aron, Jr. 
B.A. Mathematics/Economics 




David Terry Beasley 
B.A. Economics 



Alexander Herbert Bell, II 
B.A. English 



Scott Wesley Berglund 
B.A. History and 
Bible & Religion 




Richard Harrod Blank, Jr. 
B.A. Government and Spanish 



Orran Lee Brown 
B.A. Government 



Paul Garland Brown 
B.S. Chemistry 



33 





Dennis Dickens Bryant 
B.A. English 




George Keller Bumgardner 
B.S. Chemistry 





Robert Alton Burrell 
B.A. Psychology 



Stokely Gray Caldwell, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 



John Walter Fitchett Canter 
B.A. Government 



34 




Ben Montgomery Cart, Jr. 
B.A. History 



Michael Stanley Challenor 
B.A. History 



Charles Irwin Clark 
B.A. Economics 





David Mac Kay dough 
B.A. Psychology 



Thomas Mason Crowder 
B.A. Government 



Barry Kim Cutright 
B.S. Biology 




Jon Michael Daly 
B.A. Economics 



David Burton Darden 
B.S. Biology 



Philip Gilmore Davis, II 
B.A. Economics 



35 






Richard Andrew Davis 
B.A. Government 



Robert Richard Dawson 
B.A. Government 



Henry Fenton Day, III 
B.S. Biology 




Frederick Lyman Dewey, III 
B.A. Economics 



Nicholas Constantine Dombalis 
B.S. Biology 







\ 




Douglas Bayard Donaldson 
B.A. Economics 





Donald Richard Dorey 
B.A. Economics and Spanish 



Joseph Boyd Earhart, Jr. 
B.A. Psychology 



Richard Edd English 
B.A. Economics 



36 




Gerald William Fauth, III 
B.A. History 




Michael Stuart Feinman 
B.S. Biology 






Clifford Gerald Ferrara 
B.A. English 



John Edwin Fidler, Jr. 
B.S. Biology 



37 




Robert Dixon Foster 
B.S. Economics/Mathematics 



Joseph Thomas Francis, Jr. 
B.A. Government 



Douglas Sykes Freeman 
B.A. Government 




David Heath Gates 
B.S. Biology 



Thomas Walter Godfrey, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 



John Robert Graham, Jr. 
B.A. Government 




Steve Goodman Green 
B.A. Economics/Mathematics 



Samuel Lee Groseclose 
B.S. Biology 



Lawrence Dean Hamnett 
B.A. Government and History 



38 




Michael Stephen Harcum 
B.A. Economics 



John Thadieu Harris, III 
B.A. German and 
Bible & Religion 



Richard Dean Harris, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 




Horace Rowe Hicks, Jr. 
B.A. Government 



39 




John Gatling Hofler, Jr. 
B.A. History 



David Powell Holt 
B.S. Biology 



James Jay Hundley 
B.A. Psychology 




'■ wi 







wmzmk. 







I i 



Robert Blain Huskey, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 





Douglas Gray Hilton 
B.A. Government and History 



40 






Franklin Jefferson James 
B.A. Government 



Allen Easley Johnson, Jr. 
B.A. English 



Richard Mark Johnson 
B.A. Government 




Robert Bay Johnson 
B.A. English 



Todd Carrington Johnson 
B.A. English 



James Monroe Jones, III 
B.A. Government 




Bobby John Junes 
B.A. Economics 



Joseph Crockett Kelley, Jr. 
B.S. Physics 



James Warren Kelley 
B.S. Physics 



41 




Richard Lester Lapp 
B.S. Biology 



John Wesley Leary 
B.A. History 



42 





4l~ 




Keith Wayne Lewis 
B.A. Economics 




James Bowen Litton 
B.S. Economics/Mathematics 




Philip Nelson Light 
B.S. Biology 




Robert Elford Livingston, Jr. 
B.S. Chemistry 




Charles Keith Love 
B.A. Government 



Gregory Goode Love 
B.A. Economics 



43 





William Benedict Lumpkin, III 
B.A. History 




Dale Talmadge Marks 
B.A. Economics 




Frank Conrad Martin, III 
B.A. Government 



Ernest Andrew McAbee 
B.A. Economics 



Joe Vincent Menendez 
B.A. Government 



44 





Robert Baxter Mem 
B.A. History 



Randolph Parker Miles 
B.S. Biology 



Harland Lamar Miller, III 
B.A. Economics 




John Augustus Moore, Jr. 
B.A. Economics and History 




Julian Adair Moore, Jr. 

B.A. Economics and 

Government 



William Spurr Moore 
B.A. History 




Wyatt Rorer Murphy, Jr. 
B.S. Chemistry 



Michael Edward Nerney 
B.S. Chemistry 



Wilson Bennett Newell, Jr. 
B.A. Mathematics/Economics 



45 







H. William Niedermayer, III 
B.S. Chemistry 



Edward Vincent O'Hanlan 
B.A. Humanities 



Wayne David Old 
B.S. Biology 





Thomas Wentworth Osgood 
B.A. Government 



Bradley Jay Parsons 
B.A. Classics 



Paul Tulane Patterson 
B.A. Economics 




James Doddridge Patton, IV 
B.A. Economics 



Joseph Bernard Penick 
B.A. Economics 



Bruce Collier Phillips 
B.A. Psychology 



46 




Chester David Porter, III 
B.A. Economics 



William DeHart Redd 
B.A. Government 



David Winston Rennolds 
B.A. Economics 




Barry Lynn Riddle 
B.S. Chemistry 



William Rosenberger, II 
B.S. Biology 



William Laird Sager, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 




.P*» 




47 



&*n 







Charles Preston Sargeant 
B.A. Bible & Religion 




Michael Murrell Shelton 
B.A. Government 



R. Garsed Sketchley, III 
B.A. Government 





Paul English Smith 
B.A. Classics 



Samuel Edward Smith, Jr. 
B.A. Economics 



Edward Philip Snyder 
B.S. Chemistry 




John Edward Sommers, III 
B.S. Biology 



Frank Dew Stoneburner, Jr. 
B.S. Biology 



John Arthford Stough, Jr. 
B.A. History 



48 




Brian Milbank Thurston 
B.A. Economics 




Edward Lawrence Tiernan 
B.A. History 



Randolph Edmunds Traynham 
B.A. Bible & Religion 



Scott Sheldon Twentyman 
B.S. Biology 



13467,: 



COLLEGE LIBRARY 
tfAMPDEN-SYDNEY, VA. 



49 




Douglas Hart VanNess 
B.A. Government 



Thomas Carter Waddell 
B.A. Economics 



Barrye Langhorne Wall 
B.A. Economics 




Steven Edward Wall 
B.S. Biology 



Thomas Craven Wall 
B.S. Biology 



John Wistar Walke 
B.S. Biology 




David Bruce Ward 
B.A. Economics 



James Wheeler White 
B.S. Biology 



Robert Graham White, III 

B.A. Humanities and 

Economics 



50 





Robert Putnam Whitehouse 
B.S. Biology 



Robert Major Wilson 
B.A. Economics 



Edward Theodore Wolanski 
B.S. Chemistry 



Not Pictured 



Thomas Page Allport 
B.A. Psychology 

Oliver Witcher Dudley, IV 
B.A. Economics 

Frederick Charles Hamer, III 
B.A. History 

William Ross Landreth 
B.A. Government 

Allen Wayne Rosen 
B.A. Government 

Bruce Everett Thompson 
B.A. Philosophy 

James Weldon Wallace 
B.A. Economics 

Lynwood Poythress Baird 
B.S. Physics 

David Gillen Graham 
B.S. Interscience/Biochemistry 

David Jackson Newcomer 
B.S. Biology 



Bennie Griffin Brown 
B.A. Government 

Mark Wayne Goodin 
B.A. Government 

Joseph Brown Heldreth, III 
B.A. Economics 

Gerald Edward Laumann 
B.A. Government 

Vincent Louis Silvestri 
B.A. Economics 

Charles Stockley M. Tipton 
B.A. Economics 

Charles Houston Webb 
B.A. History 

Philip Martin Bayliss 
B.S. Chemistry 

Taeho Kim 
B.S. Biology 

David Russell Terry 
B.S. Biology 



Patrick Campbell Devine, Jr. 
B.A. Psychology 

Irving Quincy Gratch, III 
B.A. Chemistry 

William White Lacy, Jr. 
B.A. Psychology 

James Fain Peebles 
B.A. History 

Noel Blaine Slone 
B.A. Government and History 

John Mason Underwood, II 
B.A. Economics 

Robert Holt Whitt, Jr. 
B.A. English 

Buford Lee Driskill, III 
B.S. Biology 

Donald Lee McDowell 
B.S. Chemistry 

Harold Radcliffe Turner 
B.S. Physics and Mathematics 



51 



Seniors at work 





52 



. . and at play. 




. s.l:> ■ 



53 





54 




Mike Adkins 
Sam Adsit 



Tad Archer 
Scott Aron 
Rick Bagby 



Wayne Bailey 

Steve Barnhart 

Gary Beck 



Lewis Bell 

Mike Bennett 

Elliott Bondurant 



Bob Agee 
Randy Appleton 




55 



Dick Boyd 



Joe Bradner 



David Burgess 



Greg Burnette 

Jimmy Butler 

Bob Calcote 

David Cantlay 



John Carpenter 

Bob Chad wick 

Stuart Christian 

Clint Clary 




56 




Gilbert Coleman 



David Corrigan 



Laird Craighill 



Hatcher Crenshaw 
Rick Curtis 
King Dietrich 
John Eagan 



L.F. Elliott 
Richard Epperson 
Jerry Face 
Marcus Fariss 



57 



Greg Feldmann 

Craig Folio 

Gary Fralin 

Frank Fulton 



Harold Gielow 

Rusty Godfrey 

Gary Goldstein 

Amauri Gonzalez 



Thomas Goode 
David Haga 



Chuck Hamer 
Ran Henry 



Trip Hobbs 
Chip Holston 




f 1*441 1 





58 




Jack Holz 



Carter Hotchkiss 



Kevin Howard 
Bill Hughes 
Tom Jackson 
Ken Johnston 



Jack Jones 
Jeff Kelley 
Phil Kelsey 
Kendall Kilgore 



Erick Koroneos 
Gideon Kyole 
Craig Lamond 
Dan Laughlin 



59 



Dick Lea 

Randy Leach 

Gordy Lee 




60 




John Power 
Tommy Preston 
Bill Richmond 
Robert Ross 



61 



Scott Schoenhut 

Will Seymour 

Steve Smith 

Walter Smith 



Gerald Spurgin 

Weaver Squire 

Tom Stokes 

Pat Stonnell 




Jim Taylor 



62 



Rob Taylor 
John Terry 
Fred Thompson 




Joe Wadsworth 
Will Watkins 
Clinton Western 
Orrin Whyte 



Roy Williams 
Larry Willis 



Will Willman 
Billy Winburn 



Ken Woodiey 
George Wright 



63 



SofeAomore& 




64 



Mike Ackermann 
Jim Adams 
Jim Adams 





Jim Alexander 

Jeff Alloway 

Phillip Anderson 



tiMtihmk 





Donnie Appich 
Jonathan Atkinson 
Terry Avison 



Philip Baker 
Ray Barnhill 
David Barrs 



Ron Batliner 
Kevin Beale 
Bryan Beecroft 



Don Benner 
Jay Best 
Billy Blackford 



65 



Jeff Boatwright 

John Boross 

Scott Boze 

Chris Bradshaw 



Chip Brierre 
Paul Brooks 



Denis Brown 
Tucker Burge 



Jack Burke 
Ray Byrd 



Brian Cann 
Ricky Cash 



Steve Coffield 
John Corey 




66 




Rob Cox 
Donald Crouch 
Bill Darden 
Greg DeFrancesco 



Bill Dickinson 
Chuck Dietz 



Augie DiMunno 
Ralph Dodd 



Randy Duffer 
Bucky Durham 



Jimmy Face 
Fitz Ficklen 



Ron Fischer 
Bart Floyd 



67 







Trent Fox 

Randy Fralin 

Ford Francis 

Frank Godbold 



Tom Gray 
Bob Grover 

Bill Hardy 
Bryant Hare 



Bubba Harris 

Sel Harris 

Robbie Harris 

Ricky Henley 




68 




Dave Holder 
Bobby Howlett 



Steve Hughey 
Vance Hull 



Bucky Irby 
Jim Jervey 



Lunsford Johnson 
David Johnson 
Matt Kasun 
Gary Kavit 



Bob Keefer 
Tim Keena 
Trent Kerns 
Wade Kirby 



fcllfcfcll 





Bill Leach 
Clark Little 
Chris Long 
Tim Maxa 



69 



Overton McGehee 

Seth Mellen 

William Miles 



Rob Modlin 
Chip Moore 



Mark Morris 
David Newton 



David Ogle 
Mark Oliver 



Andy Owens 
Alec Pandaleon 




70 



I 



Doug Price 
Jim Richards 
Mark Richards 




Marc Sherrod 
Andy Shipp 
Stewart Sigler 



m 



111! 
ftll 



Pancho Richardson 
Howard Rodman 



Bill Rusher 
Vince Salazar 



Amos Saunders 
Mitchell Shaner 



Willie Shelnut 
Bob Shepherd 



71 



Tim Smith 



Callen Sparrow 



Joe Springer 



Owen Suter 

Chris Stiebel 

Loon-Kar Tan 

Steve Tedesco 




***MtMg. 



Vince Thomas 

Mark Thompson 

Joe Thornton 

Mike Thornton 



Keith Tignor 
Rusty Tindall 
Waring Trible 

Mike Turner 




72 




John Tyler 
Warren Utt 
Doug Warinner 
David Watson 



Jim Wayt 
Eddie Whealton 
David White 
James Whitehead 



Frank Winks 
Brian Witt 
Mark Yates 
Joe Ziglar 



73 



S/re&Amav 



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74 







Johnny Anderson 
Charlie Apperson 
Bennett Atwill 
Barry Auerbach 



'f 



Bruce Baber 
David Ball 
George Ball 
Dudley Bass 




Brian Boucher 
Brad Brown 
John Bullard 



Landon Burke 

Gordon Burks 

Sergio Capocelli 



▲ fe4 t^ 



Jeff Carlucci 

Rick Carney 

Doug Carothers 



Bruce Coleman 

Jeff Cordes 

Parke Cox 




75 



Chuck Crook 

Eddie Cumbey 

Bill Currie 

Tom Curtis 

Mike D'Agata 



Jeff Daly 

Mark Davis 

Tom Davis 

Doug Denham 

Dan Doherty 



Demetri Economos 
Mike Edwards 



Sam Eggleston 
Russ Evans 



Mike Fay 
Henry Fine 



Tim Fitzpatrick 
David Fletcher 



Preston Fox 
Bill Freeman 




t&tktfA 




76 







*'MA% 






Tracy Gammon 
Ward Good 
Billy Grier 
Bruce Gunn 
Fred Haar 



Henry Hale 
Bill Hancock 
David Harrington 
David Haw 
Tim Henry 



Louis Holgate 
David Huddle 



Ward Huntley 
Danny Huskey 



Fred Irving 
Bill Jervey 



Bill Jones 
Mike Joynes 



Drew Karo 
Dan Keane 



77 



John Keesling 
Scott Keller 



Tony Kent 
Phillip Key 



Ken Kilgour 
John Kyle 



Keith Leach 
Ken Leach 



Cary Levering 

Boiling Lewis 

Marty Long 

Ed Mack 

Kevin Mahoney 



Walter Malone 

Walt Manger 

Camp Marks 

Allen Mason 

Jon Mastropaolo 



Mayor McCulloch 

Scott Moorhead 

Bill Morgan 

Reggie Morris 

Dabo Noftsinger 




78 





George Norrington 






4*4 AAifc 




Jon Pananas 



Manie Parker 



Mitch Peterson 



Andy Pollock 
Dave Porterfield 
Warren Quinn 
Craig Ramsey 
Randy Randolph 



Randy Reed 
Everett Revell 
Mike Rhea 
John Rhodes 
Fritz Ritch 



James Robertson 
Ted Robertson 
Robert Rose 
Doug Ross 
Scot Ross 



79 



Andy Rowe 



Mark Rummel 

Raiford Rustin 

Lee Salsbery 

Skip Sawyer 

Danny Schein 



Wes Schuessler 

Mike Schumacher 

Slade Screven 

Kevin Seay 

Rhea Shelton 



David Sherrod 

Don Silvester 

Rucker Snead 

Bobby Snidow 

Bill Stephenson 



Gordy Stokes 

Jim Taylor 

Phil Taylor 

Jay Thompson 

Warren Thompson 





•t 









4t* 







Athidrh*^ 




80 




Pete Thornhill 



Bill Thornton 
Royster Tucker 
Francis Vanboncoeur 
Craig Vranian 
George Waldrop 



Richard Ware 
Frank Watkins 
Doug Watson 
Robbie Watson 
Jim Weaver 



Bruce Webb 
Dwight Webb 
David West 
Greg Wilkerson 
Richard Willis 



Bill Winfield 
Leonard Winslow 
Taylor Wootton 
Bob Wrenn 
Pete Wyeth 



felt;* 4** 



81 



t" n 









s 

T 

A 
F 
F 



Infirmary 



Dr. A.B. Adams 

Mrs. Roberta Crawley 

Mrs. Linda Martin 



Campus Security 






Charles McFadden 



84 



Buildings 
and Grounds 





I.D. Beaumont 
C.W. Cason 
S.W. Kernodle 
R.E. Oliver 
W.H. Paige 
G.W. Sheffield 
J.M. Spittle 
Mrs. Queta Watson 
Mrs. Merle Wells 
S. Womack 




85 



Book Store 



W. Wilson Watson, 

Manager 

Erlene Bowman 

Joyce Eggleston 



H-S Museum 




■B^H 



86 




Slater 



^? r >| ' .M ' . j i tfff« t'i 



87 



Secretaries 




First Row: Vickie Wilson. Brenda Garrett. Kathy Smith, Merci Lackes. Barbara Livingston. Second Row: Shirley Mottley, Florence 
Seamster, Nancy Saylor. Joyce Thompson, Linnie Kernodle 



Business Office 




Virginia McFadden. Doris Cook. Barbara Reinhardt. Erma Clements 



88 




89 




,»..* 



i*'T^ 



:^ Mr 






7^ 



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S 




c 
I 

V 

I 
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The Tiger 




Ted O'Hanlan, Review Editor 

Steve Wall, News Editor 

Larry Willis, Sports Editor 




First Row: Bill Rusher, David Klein, Jay Best, Ken Woodley, Howard Rodman. Second Row: Sel Harris, Eddie Whealton, Lewis Bell, Fritz Ritsch, Marc 
Sherrod, Ed Mack, Sam Eggleston, Bill Redd, Joe Richardson. Third Row: David Sherrod, Overton McGehee, Fred Thompson, Mike Fay, Mark Morris, 
Absent: Allen Rosen, Shep Haw, Mike McCahey, Jeff James, Bill Darden, Barry Cutright. Tim Fitzpatrick, Steve Farthing, Ken Kilgour, " 
Groseclose, Greg DeFrancesco, Greg Haley, Orran Brown, Billy Wimburn. 



94 



Glee Club 




First Row: Pete Thornhill, Bill Wingfield. Andy Owens. Paul Brown, John Jeans, Lee Salsbery, Louis Holgate. Jim Richards, Robert Rose. Second Row: 
Dolph Rustin. Stewart Bond. Warren Quinn. Jim Chou. Phill Bayliss, Dr. Paul Jagasich. Third Row: Robert Snidow, Taylor Boyd, Mark Rummel, John 
Canter. Wade Kirby, James Whitehead. Francis Varboncoeur. Randy Traynham. Wes Schuessler. Back Row: Mike Rhea, Rick Cash, Doug Hilton, John 
Rhodes. Jerome Laux, Waring Trible, Jeff James, Dr. Wayne Tucker. Jim Jones, David Heppner. Marc Sherrod, Fred Irving. 



> 



41§lll|p 



Garnet 




Dan Groseclose, Editor 

Lee Driskill, Business Manager 
David Klein 

Marc Sherrod 



95 



Interfraternity 
Council 



First Semester 

Ted O'Hanlan — President 

Tom Coyle — Vice President 

Greg Feldman — Sec.-Treas. 

Second Semester 

Tom Coyle — President 

Drew Fuller — Vice President 

Brian Cann — Sec.-Treas. 




Campus Activities Committee 




Ben Brown, Sam Groseclose, Ken Johnston 

Tri-Chairmen 



96 



Kaleidoscope 




Jay Moore, Co-Editor 





Other Staff 



George Wright, Business Manager 

Photographers: 

Lewis Bell 

Andy Pollock 

Howard Rodman 

Steve Wall 

Billy Winburn 

Layout Staff: 

Louis Holgate 

Steve Tedesco 

Art Staff: 

Anne Joyner 

Kathy Rogers 

Cathy Hull 



Jay Earhart, Co-Editor 



97 




First Row (L to R) — Craig LaMond, Pat Berg, Orrin Whyte, Wilbert Parker, Rory Murphy. Howard Rodman. Jerome Laux. Jim Alexander (below) — 
Paul Smith (above) — Jay Best. Rob Cox. Mark Longerbeam. Bud Fidler. Irv Gratch. James Jennings. Second Row (L to R) — Dan Doherty, Ron Bath- 
ner, Tom Bernard, James Whitehead, Amos Saunders, Andy Pollock, Bill Grier, Mike Fay, Kevin Seay, Matt Kasun, Jim Sadighian, Spic Baker, Bill 
Leach. 




Radio 
Station 



Board of 
Publications 



Paul Smith General Manager 

John Fidler Station Manager 

Jerome Laux . . . Program Director 
Harrison DeLancy . . . 

. . . Chief Engineer 
Dick Boyd .... Personnel Director 

Bill Darden News Director 

Dr. Jorge Silveira . . . 

. . . Faculty Advisor 

John Boross . . Production Director 
Jim Alexander .... Sports Director 
Jane Pace 
Mary Thompson . . . 

. . . Entertainment Directors 




First Row — Dr. Farrell. Jay Moore. Bill Redd. Second Row — Ran Henry. Paul Smith, Dr. Sanders. 
Absent — Jay Earhart. 




Student Government Officers 




Rick Curtis, Secretary-Treasurer; Bill Redd, President; Orran Brown, Chairman of the Student Court 



Student Court 



First Row: Orran Brown, Doug 

Freeman. Second Row: Marc Sherrod, 

Doug Watson. Third Row: Sam 

Eggleston, Bill Pantele. Fourth Row: 

Waring Trible, Greg Feldman. Fifth 

Row: Tom Jackson, Drew Davis. Sixth 

Row: Bill Morgan. Absent: David Klein, 

Billy Winburn. 



Student Senate 



Mike Harcum 

Tulane Patterson 

Ed Synder 

Bob Chadwick 

Thomas Goode 

Joe Marchetti 

John Corey 

Tim Keena 

David Newton 




100 



Fire Department 



Bob Livingston 


Andy Pollock 


George Bumgardner 


Doug Ross 


Scott Schoenhut 


James Robertson 


Marvin Goin 


Bob Wrenn 


Mark Longerbeam 


Bob Keefer 


Barry Riddle 


David White 


Mark Morris 


David Newton 


Overton McGehee 


Keith Tignor 


Joe Leming 


Paul Peters 


Mike Dowler 


Ray Williams 


T.J. Jackson 


Bart Floyd 


Ralph Crawley 


Ben Jones 


Paul Smith 


Walt Manger 


John Walke 


David Barrs 


Bucky Durham 


Lyle Morton 


Jeff James 


Nat Wilkerson 


Jeff Alloway 


Lee Salsbery 




Chief Bob Livingston 



101 



I lllPfal 



Iota Beta Sigma is a fraternity 
honoring excellence in broadcasting. 



Jay Best 
Dick Boyd 
Charles Clark 
Bill Darden 
Bud Fidler 
Jerome Laux 
Amos Saunders 
Paul Smith 
Orrin Whyte 
Dr. Jorge Silveira 





Who's Who 



David Klein 
Sam Groseclose 
Bob Livingston 

Paul Smith 

Ted O'Hanlan 

Ben Brown 

Bill Redd 

Frank Martin 

Orran Brown 

Jay Moore 

Drew Davis 

Wayne Old 

Phil Bayliss 

Allen Rosen 

Tulane Patterson 

Robert Burrell 

Jay Earhart 



ircle K 



Wayne Old 

Louis Holgate 

Steve Tedesco 

Bud Fidler 

Pete Watson 

Tom Wall 

Matt Kasun 

Bill Leach 



■::.~i 



102 





Students for 

Community 

Service 




Rick Curtis 

Billy Abbott 

. Jim Kelly 

Greg Love 

Dick Bagby 

Bob Calcote 

Jim Ferguson 

Kevin Howard 

Larry Woodward 

Ray Byrd 

Bob Chadwick 

Ford Francis 

Tommy Garner 

Dan Unger 

Trip Wilson 

Greg Wilkerson 



Pi Delta Epsilon is a division of the 
Society of Collegiate Journalists, an 
organization created to acknowledge 
excellence in the area of collegiate 
journalism. 



Jay Best 

Bill Darden 

Jay Earhart 

Bud Fidler 

Dan Groseclose 

Ran Henry 

Jay Moore 

Ted O'Hanlan 

Amos Saunders 

Marc Sherrod 

Paul Smith 

Fred Thompson 

Steve Wall 

Larry Willis 

Billy Winburn 

Ken Woodley 

Dr. William Hendley 

Marty Sherrod 

Dr. Hassel Simpson 







OAK 



Omicron Delta Kappa is an honorary 
fraternity recognizing individuals who, 
through significant leadership in various 
phases of campus life, contribute 
wholesomely to the college. 



Greg Feldman 
Pete Watson 
Bill Redd 
Orran Brown 
Keith Love 
Rick Curtis 
Wayne Old 
Sam Groseclose 
Phil Bayliss 
Bob Calcote 
Tom Coyle 



\j0 



103 




A 
C 
A 
D 
E 
M 
I 
C 



<DBK 



Fratres in Collegio: 
Orran Lee Brown 
Samuel Lee Groseclose 
Scott Sheldon Twentyman 
Edward Theodore Wolanski 
Robert Daniel Groseclose 
Philip Martin Bayliss 
Scott Wesley Berglund 
Paul Garland Brown 
Joseph Thomas Francis, Jr. 
Taeho Kim 

Robert Elford Livingston, Jr. 
William DeHart Redd 
Paul English Smith 
Frank Dew Stoneburner, Jr. 
Barrye Langhorne Wall 
Thomas Craven Wall 



Fratres in Facultate: 

Dr. Bagby 

Mr. Brinkley 

Dr. Crawley 

Dr. Farrell 

Dr. Heinemann 

Dr. Joyner 

Dr. Norment 

Dr. Porterfield 

Dr. Sanders 

Dr. D.S. Thompson 

Dr. G.H. Thompson 

Dr. Tucker 

Fratres in Urbe: 
Mr. Sherrod 
Dr. McClintock 
Dr. Gilmer 
Dr. Holbrook 



OAEXBO 



Omicron Delta Epsilon is an honorary 


Chi Beta Phi is a national honorary 


economics fraternity dedicated to the 


scientific fraternity existing to recognize 


advancement of the study of economics 


excellence in scientific endeavors and to 


and honoring those students of 


encourage participation in scientific 


economics who show particular interest 


fields. 


in the discipline. 






Bob Agee 


Philip Davis 


Phil Bayliss 


Thomas Godfrey, Jr. 


Paul Brown 


Joseph Heldreth, III 


Jim Chou 


J. Christian Kohler 


Richard Curtis 


James Litton 


Amauri Gonzalez 


Harland Miller, III 


Sam Groseclose 


J. Adair Moore, Jr. 


Robert Livingston 


Wilson Newell, Jr. 


Mike Nerney 


Barrye Wall 


Wayne Old 


F. Marcus Fariss 


Barry Riddle 


Frank Pegram 


Dolph Rustin 


Robert Ross 


Steve Smith 


Prof. Robert Harris 


Hank Stoneburner 


Dr. William Hendley 


Scott Twentyman 


Dr. Moses Musoke 


John Walke 


Dr. Francis Spreng 


Tom Wall 




Pete Watson 




Ed Wolanski 



106 




HI* 



Eta Sigma Phi is the national honorary 
classical fraternity. Its membership 
includes those individuals who have 
demonstrated high proficiency in the 
study of the classics. 

Orran Brown 

Robert Whitt 

Jay White 

Robert Wilson 

Bradley Parsons 

Paul Smith 

Barry Cutright 

Ted O'Hanlan 

Barry Riddle 

William Redd 

Jeff James 

Joe Leming 

Tom Douglas 

Randy Stokes 

William Plunkett 

William Leach 

Scott Berglund 

Lewis Bell 

Bob Agee 

Bob Livingston 

David Haugh 

Greg Feldman 

Tim Keena 

Bart Floyd 

Jim Adams 

Dr. Graves Thompson 

Dr. C. Wayne Tucker 

Mr. John Brinkley 

Dr. Donald Ortner 

Dr. Lewis Drew 

Dr. Richard McClintock 

Mr. Thomas Shomo 

Elsa Harvey 

Mrs. Graves Thompson 

Teresa Wood 

Rhonda Simms 



nzA 



Pi Sigma Alpha is the National 
Political Science Honor Society. It 
recognizes juniors and seniors who have 
attained high standards of scholarship 
and academic distinction both in political 
science and in the sum total of their 
academic work. 



Steven McChristian 
William Redd 
Franklin J. James 
John Canter 
Robert Whitt 
Orran Brown 
Michael Bennett 
Keith Love 
John Carpenter 
Dr. Joseph Goldberg 
Dr. David Holly 
Dr. David Marion 
Dr. James Simms 
Mrs. James Simms 
Dr. Robert Hubbard 




107 




s 
o 
c 
I 

A 
L 






S A E 

I L P 

GPS 

M H I 

A A L 

O 

N 





110 




R.H. Blank 
B.G. Brown 
S.G. Caldwell 
S.G. Green 
D.H. LaMotte 
J.C. Lester. Jr. 
J.E. Mansfield 
F.C. Martin 
R.C. Morehead 
R.S. Sutton 
T.C. Waddell 
R.H. Whitt 
T.M. Akers 
J. P. Bradner 
L.L. Dillard 
D.E. Ellis 



F.M. Fariss 
G.S. Hobbes 
W.B. Holston, III 
D.J. Lucey 
C.R. McKenney 
R.B. Rustin 
W.A. Winburn 
M.F. Ackerman 
P.B. Baker 
P.H. Brooks 
J.L. Davis 
W.H. Edwards 
D.R. Fuller 
R.B. Hare 
L.P. Huff 
S.B. Mellen 



A.D. Owens 
S.M. Sigler 
W.M. Taylor 
J.T. Wayt 
J.M. Ziglar 
C.W. Crook 
A.D. Feld, Jr. 
P.D. Fout 
R.B. Hayes, III 
C.L. Johnson 
D.A. Keane 
J.B. Lewis, III 
W.H.- Morgan, Jr. 
R.C. Parker 
R.K. Pearson, Jr. 
B.K. Witt 



111 




112 




C.I. Clark 
J.E. Fidler 
F.C. Hamer 
D.W. Rennolds 
R.P. Whitehouse 
W.C. Hughes 
M.K. Kiser 
G.C. Lee 
R.P. Mason 
J.C. Richardson 



S.E. Schoenhut 
J.V. Ciucci 
D.R. Hauch 
W.G. Plunkett 
R.J. Shepherd 
D.M. Slack 
D.P. Watson 
W.D. Bass 
G.D. Mason 
G.S. Waldrop 



113 



PGD 
HA E 

IML 
MT 
AA 





114 




R.M. Bayliss 
J.W.F. Canter 
M.W. Goodin 
D.G. Graham 
R.D. Harris 
F.J. James 
J.E. Sommers, III 
T.C. Wall 
J.D. Carneal, Jr. 
J.T.M. Chou 
S.J. Coffield 



J.B. Coulter 
J.J. Fararo 
H.R. Gielow 
E.S. Hunter, III 
CD. Laughlin 
G.F. Willman 
J.W. Anderson, Jr. 
B.W. Auerbach 
B.A. Baber, Jr. 
D.S. Denham 
S.D. Farthing 



T.M. Fitzpatrick 
D.H. Fletcher 
W.J. Hancock 
J.C. Keesling 
P.S. Laughlin 
J.S. Pananas 
D.L. Porterfield 
M.C. Rummel 
D.J. Rutledge 
W. Schuessler 



115 



s s 
I I 

G G 
MM 
A A 








116 





J.G. 


Baker 


C.F. 


Blackwell 


J.M. 


Burbank 


B.M 


. Cart 


D.M 


. Daniel 


N.P. 


Farmer 


G.M 


. Fauth 


C.L. 


Pitzer 


S.E. 


Wall 


T.B. 


Archer 


P.E. 


Armstrong 



J.S. 


Bean 


W.D 


. Blackford 


R.V 


Hatcher 


S.L. 


Hughey 


J.K. 


Killgore 


J.A. 


Martin, Jr. 


J. A. 


Mell 


C.S. 


Shaw 


C.L. 


Bradshaw 


R.T. 


Brierre, III 


W.D 


. Brown, IV 



J.D. Burke 
W.A. Dickinson, III 
D.C. Poehler 
G.R. Preas, II 
J.C. Sparrow 
E.B. Tazewell 
S.H. Tucker- 
W.E. Harrison 
J.S. Molster 
W.C. Newman, IV 



117 



K S 

A I 

P G 

P M 

A A 



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118 




B.M. Boze 
B.L. Driskill 
J.S. Haw 
C.P. Kiely 
D.A. Klein 
D.T. Marks 
J.M. McMahon 
J.C. McEwen 
John A. Moore, Jr. 
W.S. Moore 
J.D. Patton 
J.F. Peebles 



R.G. White 
P.C. Bowles 
E.H. Crenshaw 
R.P. Epperson 
R.A. Farmar 
G.W. Feldmann 
T.E. Goode 
J. P. Irby 
E.A. Koroneos 
H.W. Maclin 
J.F. Outten 
R.M. Paul 



T.L. Preston 
R.S. Reinhardt 
R.R. Rosebro 
R.B. Taylor 
E.S. Boze 
B.M. Cann 
E.C. Craighill 
C.S. Long 
W.R. Nexten 
J.G. Overton 
J.R. Springer 
J.B. Bullard, III 



D.W. Burgess 
W.A. Carrington 
J.W. Craddock 
C.J. Daly 
G.L. Crenshaw 
W.S. Driskill 
R.W. Good 
W.A. Karo 
C.C. Levering 
D.C. Marks 
W.S. Roberts 
F.P. Watkins, Jr. 



119 



PSA 


%L 


1 1 L 




G P 


% 


M H 


\ ( 


A A 







120 




R.A. Davis 


D.P. Corrigan 


R.E. Cash 


J.O. Cordes 


G.W. Duncan 


R.E. Curtis 


R.F. Francis 


P.H. Cox, III 


K.W. Lewis 


L.F. Elliott 


T.A. Garner 


F.B. Lawrence 


G.G. Love 


J.D. Ferguson 


T.P. Gray 


J.D. Mastropoalo 


W.S. Mahanes 


K.M. Howard 


C.H. Helm 


A.C. Rowe, Jr. 


N.B. Slone 


T.M. Jackson 


O.L. Schrum 


J.C. Taylor, III 


R.M. Wilson 


J. P. Marchetti 


D.V. Unger 


J.C. Thompson, Jr. 


R.E. Appleton 


G.M. Pace 


N.W. Wilson 


F.G. Varboncoeur 


R.A. Bagby 


W.P. Smith 


M.E. Yates 


W.N. Watkins 


B.E. Bondurant 


C.T. Talley 


M.R. Bohannon 


P.G. Wilkerson 


R.D. Calcote 


L.H. Woodward 


G.E. Burks, III 




R.G. Chadwick 


I.R. Byrd 


J.B. Coleman 





121 




122 




W.L. Abbott 


W.D. Redd 


W.D. Richmond 


W.R. Currie 


D.M. Clough 


C.P. Sargeant 


P.R. Watson 


W.L. Freeman 


J.M. Daly 


V.L. Silvestri 


J.K. Woodley 


D.A.S. Heppner 


D B Darden 


_J-W—White — - 


D R Benner 


D F Huddle 


1 s ■ L-J ■ L^ Li. 1 Vi ^ 1 1 

R.E. English 


E.M. Adkins 


T.F. Carter 


is • X p 1 1 L ■ UVi Iv 

D.A. Huskey 


R.D. Foster 


S.S. Aron 


R.W. Dodd 


W.D. Jones 


D.S. Freeman 


D.M. Brown 


R.L. Duffer 


B.W. Paulette 


M.S. Harcum 


G.F. Burnette 


B.F. Knight 


M.P. Peterson 


R.B. Huskey 


T.C.G. Coyle 


M.W. Patterson 


R.E. Snidow 


J.W. Kelly 


J.S.Jones 


A.R. Shipp 


J.K. Thompson, Jr. 


W.B. Newell 


W.W. Newell 


T.A. Smith 


D.C. Watson 


P.T. Patterson 


S.R. Peterson 


J. A. Tyler 





123 



TC 
HH 
E I 

T 
A 





124 




A.H. Bell 


G.W. Munden 


M.A. Henry 


C.E. Caton 


P.G. Davis 


H.W. Niedermayer 


R.W. Oldfield 


R.N. Doummar 


P.D. Devine 


D.J. Newcomer 


T.L. Stokes 


T.W. Gammon 


C.L. Fulton 


E.V. O'Hanlan 


J.M. Wolcott 


G.J. Haley 


D.H. Gates 


B.C. Phillips 


J.S. Harris 


A. P. Myers, Jr. 


T.W. Godfrey 


W. Rosenburger 


W.V. Hull 


D.C. Noftsinger 


C.A. Harris 


W.D. Rusher 


R.C. Modlin 


G.D. Norrington 


D.P. Holt 


E.P. Snyder 


J.R. Stokes 


M.A. Rhea 


R.B. Johnson 


C.S.M. Tipton 


W. Trible 


W.R. Shelton 


T.C. Johnson 


R.E. Traynham 


D.R. Wyatt 


W.C. Stephenson, IV 


R.M. Johnson 


J.M. Underwood 


D.M. Ball 


G.K. Stokes 


T.P. McDonald 


S.D. Adsit 


R.L. Carney 


J.D. Taylor 



125 



L 


C A 


A 


H L 


M 


1 P 


B 


H 


D 


A 


A 





/?^;^S> 






^tfW--' 






R.R. Dawson 


G.J. Beck 


D.J. Boatwright 


F.F. Senter 


M.S. Feinmann 


M.T. Bennett 


E.D. Brown 


G.S. Talley 


J.B. Heldreth 


W.L. Birdsong 


J.M. Face 


E.D. Warinner 


J.G. Hofler 


R.C. Clary 


C.R. Fralin 


E.B. Atwill 


H.R. Hicks 


K.H. Dietrich 


W.E. Hardy 


G.B. Brown 


W.R. Landreth 


J.G. Eagan 


D.W. Harris 


L.M. Burke 


W.B. Lumpkin 


J.G. Face 


R.A. Henley 


T.M. Cozad, Jr. 


J.V. Menendez 


R.H. Lea 


G.A. Horkan 


P.W. Key 


R.B. Merrell 


P.W. Squire 


B.L. Howlett 


R.C. Revercomb 


D.L. Roberts 


J.E. Williams 


D.R. Jordan 


S.A. Ross 


W.L. Sager 


S.E. Zedaker 


J.M. Kasun 


H.B. Vincent, Jr 


F.D. Stoneburner 


A. P. Atha 


D.C. McElwee 


J.B. Weaver 


D.H. VanNess 


J.G. Atkinson 


C.F. Moore, III 


R.T.P. Willis 


B.L. Wall 


H.H. Bateman 


W.J. Pantele 





126 




127 




128 




D.T. Beasley 


F.L. Pegram 


G.G. Ball, Jr. 


W.M. Long 


T.M. Crowder 


R.T. Ross 


M.E. Bishop 


W.J. Malone, Jr. 


N.C. Dombalis 


G.B. Spurgin 


E.F. Brown 


C.A. Mason 


J.B. Earhart 


R.B. Thompson 


S. Capocelli 


M.L. McKinnon 


T.M. Heery 


J.V. Babashak 


T.M. Davis 


W.G. Mikell, Jr. 


J.J. Hundley 


T.F. Boyd 


F.H. Haar, Jr. 


W.A. Quinn 


R.L. Lapp 


G.C. Buchanan 


D.M. Harrington 


P.R. Randolph 


M.E. Nerney 


W.H.O. Kirby 


J.M. Hoke 


J.R. Rhodes 


T.W. Osgood 


J.D. Thornton 


F.F. Irving 


J.S. Screven 


CD. Porter 


J.W. Utt. Jr. 


L.N. Joynes, II 


L.R. Snead 


C.H. Webb 


G. Wright. IV 


J.L. Kyle 


T.F. Wilcox 


C.W. Hotchkiss 









129 



AC S 
LH I 
P I G 
H M 
A A 




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130 




P.G. Brown 


J.J. Sadighian 


T. Kim 


P.D. Seay 


R.E. Livingston, Jr. 


S.C. Smith 


W.R. Murphy, III 


J.A.C. Wadsworth 


B.L. Riddle 


J.E. Laux 


P.E. Smith 


M.S. Morris 


S.S. Twenty man 


D.G. Ogle 


J.W. Walke 


D.K. Doherty 


E.T. Wolanski 


R.M. Fay 


R.L. Agee 


B.L. Greer 


P.D. Blanton 


R.B. Gunn 


S.J. Chu 


A.J. Pollock 


C.G. Lamond 


L.K. Salsbery 



131 




A 
T 
H 
L 
E 
T 
I 
C 
S 




135 








(9-1) 




H-SC 


27 


Guilford 


6 


H-SC 


22 


Sewanee 





H-SC 


14 


James Madison University 


17 


H-SC 


35 


Bridgewater 


7 


H-SC 


44 


Liberty Baptist College 


24 


H-SC 


49 


Washington and Lee 





H-SC 


24 


Davidson 


20 


H-SC 


38 


Emory and Henry 


20 


H-SC 


28 


Maryville 


11 


H-SC 


35 


Randolph-Macon College 


7 


N.C.A.A. ] 


division III First Round Playoff 




H-SC 


45 


Albany State 


51 



Jimmy Ferguson 
Stokeley Fulton 
First Team 
Jimmy Ferguson, RB 
Ben Newell, WR 
Bob Wilson, OT 
Keith Love, OG 
Dale Marks, QB 
Mike Adams, Punter 
Tim Smith, DT 
Noel Slone, DE 
Mike Harcum, DB 



1977 Football 

All O.D.A.C. 

"Player of the Year" 

"Coach of the Year" 
Second Team 
Joe Heldreth, OT 
Wally Moore, C 
Keith Lewis, TE 
Bill Moore, RB 
Cecil Talley, DT 
Jim Thompson, LB 
Rick English, DB 
Frank Fulton, DB 



136 



Division III All-American 
Jimmy Ferguson — Second Team, running back 
Bob Wilson — Third Team, offensive tackle 
Ben Newell — Honorable Mention, wide receiver 




Honors 

Richmond Touchdown Club 

Jimmy Ferguson — Small College Offensive Player of the Year 
Stokeley Fulton — Small College Football Coach of the Year 

N.C.A.A. 

Jimmy Ferguson — Ranked second in Division III in rushing per 
game (139.5 yards) and scoring (10.7 points). 

Kodak Division III Ail-American 



Bob Wilson — 


First Team, 


offensive lineman 




Football Lettermen 


M. Adkins 




D. Davis 


E. Bondurant 




G. De Francisco 


B. Calcote 




J. Eagan 


R. Cash 




R. English 


J. Cordes 




J. Ferguson 


R. Curtis 




R. Fralin 



F. Francis 


T. Patterson 


F. Fulton 


W. Redd 


T. Garner 


S. Sawyer 


T. Gray 


O. Schrum 


M. Harcum 


N. Slone 


D. Harris 


T. Smith 


J. Heldreth 


C. Steibel 


K. Howard 


S. Sudduth 


B. Junes 


C. Talley 


F. Lawrance 


J. Thompson 


R. Leach 


D. Unger 


K. Lewis 


B. Wilson 


K. Love 


L. Woodward 


D. Marks 




T. Maxa 




B. Merrell 




B. Moore 




W. Moore 




S. Moorhead 




B. Newell 





137 




138 




139 




J^. w^i 




140 




141 




142 




143 




H-SC 
H-SC 




1 


Virginia Military Institute 
Radford 


2 
2 


H-SC 
H-SC 
H-SC 
H-SC 
H-SC 
H-SC 




2 
1 


5 
1 


Lynchburg 

Liberty Baptist College 

University of Virginia 

N.C. Wesleyan 

University of Richmond 

Pfeiffer 


1 


5 
2 
1 
6 


H-SC 


1 


Washington and Lee 





H-SC 


1 


Roanoke 


3 


H-SC 
H-SC 


1 
1 


Christopher Newport 
Eastern Mennonite 


4 

2 


H-SC 
H-SC 



9 


Randolph-Macon College 
Longwood College 


3 

2 





First Row: Tom Crowder. Harland Miller. Tom Osgood. David Holt. Jay Hundley. Pat Devine, Eric Zedaker, Davis Wildman, Jim Adams, Martin 
Ferrara. Second Row: Mark Rummell. Will Willman. Lunsford Johnson. Frank Watkins. Bill Freeman. Sergio Capocelli, David Clough, Bill Richmond, 
Fred Harr. Randy Randolph. George Ball. Mike McKinnon. Ed Brown. Mike Hoke, Coach Simms. 












147 




148 




149 




150 




SPIftiiP Team R oster 




Jim Alexander 
John Canter 
Jim Chou 
Billy Greer 
Wade Kirby 
Bruce Phillips 







(1-10) 




H-SC 


68 


Virginia Military Institute 


17 


H-SC 


68 


Liberty Baptist College 


56 


H-SC 


80 


Davidson 


20 


H-SC 


80 


Lynchburg 


41 


H-SC 


99 


James Madison University 


16 


H-SC 


99 


Lynchburg 


52 


H-SC 


99 


Roanoke 


76 


H-SC 


22 


Radford 


39 


H-SC 


115 


Eastern Mennonite 


26 


H-SC 


115 


James Madison University 


31 


H-SC 


115 


Washington and Lee 


70 




151 




152 




153 




Lettermen 

R. Burrell 

D. Corrigan 

L. Elliott 

T. Jackson 

F. Godbold 

B. Howlett 

E. Owens 

J. Masterpaolo 

A. Payne 

B. Shelly 
R. Tindall 
R. Tucker 







(17-8) 




H-SC 


84 


York 


75 


H-SC 


80 


Clinch Valley 


65 


H-SC 


88 


Washington and Lee 


89 


H-SC 


69 


Guilford 


99 



H-SC 


84 


Anderson-Broaddus 


77 


H-SC 


96 


Liberty Baptist College 


80 


H-SC 


70 


N.C. Wesleyan 


57 


H-SC 


115 


Eastern Mennonite 


77 


H-SC 


85 


Emory and Henry 


67 


H-SC 


75 


Bluefield College 


65 


H-SC 


72 


Elon 


76 


H-SC 


94 


Bridgewater 


74 


H-SC 


67 


Liberty Baptist College 


53 


H-SC 


82 


Virginia Wesleyan 


70 


H-SC 


59 


Lynchburg College 


80 


H-SC 


81 


Washington and Lee 


74 


H-SC 


50 


Randolph-Macon College 


51 


H-SC 


102 


Bridgewater 


72 


H-SC 


69 


Shenandoah College (20T) 


75 


H-SC 


88 


Eastern Mennonite (20T) 


86 


H-SC 


60 


Randolph-Macon College 


71 


H-SC 


92 


N.C. Wesleyan (OT) 


81 


H-SC 


92 


Lynchburg College 


63 


H-SC 


78 


Emory and Henry 
(ODAC Tournament) 


63 


H-SC 


57 


Lynchburg College 


88 



154 




155 




156 




157 




158 








(1-6) 




H-SC 


18 


Eastern Mennonite 


28 


H-SC 


5 


Lynchburg 


35 


H-SC 


29 


Eastern Mennonite 


19 


H-SC 





Liberty Baptist College 


53 


H-SC 


15 


Catawba 


36 


H-SC 


3 


Washington and Lee 


45 


H-SC 


6 


Davidson 
O.D.A.C. — 4th place 


42 



Lettermen 

Billy Abbott 
Chuck Dietz 
John Eagan 
Demetri Economos 
Billy Greer 
David Hepner 
Wade Kirby 
John Martin 
Dave Porterfield 
Stephen Shaw 




159 




160 




161 




162 








(14-12) 




H-SC 


4 


Virginia Commonwealth 


3 


H-SC 


9-9 


Washington and Lee 


5-3 


H-SC 


6 


Eastern Connecticut 


15 


H-SC 


7-7 


Emory and Henry 


3-3 


H-SC 


2-12 


Guilford 


5-4 


H-SC 


7-1 


N.C. Wesleyan 


3-3 


H-SC 


7 


Liberty Baptist College 


9 


H-SC 


5-14 


Ferrum 


7-8 


H-SC 


7 


Guilford 


1 


H-SC 





Lynchburg 


4 


H-SC 


26 


Longwood College 


1 


H-SC 


7-9 


Virginia Wesleyan 


3-11 


H-SC 


12 


Randolph-Macon College 


9 


H-SC 


2 


Liberty Baptist College 


9 


H-SC 


1 


Lynchburg 


2 


H-SC 


5-9 


Eastern Mennonite 


2-6 


H-SC 


10-4 


Bridgewater 


9-16 


H-SC 


6 


Bridgewater 
O.D.A.C. — second place 


16 



Lettermen 



M. Adkins 
M. Bohannon 
D. Benner 
R. Epperson 
J. Ferguson 
P. Fox 
F. Fulton 
T. Maxa 
S. Moorhead 
Ben Newell 
Bill Newell 
B. Niedermayer 
S. Sawyer 
J. Thompson 
J. White 
M. Yates 



163 





164 




165 



\"W" 



w* ■•; 



^ 



m 

























J\ 



tt. 



166 




167 




Lettermen 

B. Cart 

G. Feldmann 

B. Driskill 

B. Lewis 

J. Mansfield 

J. Quarles 

V. Thomas 

R. Tucker 







(3-8) 




H-SC 


1 


James Madison University 


8 


H-SC 





University of Richmond 


9 


H-SC 


1 


George Mason University 


8 


H-SC 


3 


Christopher Newport 


6 


H-SC 


8 


Lynchburg College 


1 


H-SC 


6 


Virginia Military Inst. 


3 


H-SC 


5 


Emory and Henry College 


4 


H-SC 





Virginia Polytechnic Inst. 


9 


H-SC 


1 


Old Dominion University 


8 


H-SC 


3 


Randolph-Macon College 


6 


H-SC 


2 


Washington and Lee 


7 


O.D.A.C 




3rd place 





168 




169 



G 
O 
L 
F 










170 








(9-5-1) 




H-SC 


424 


Atlantic Christian 


419 


H-SC 


424 


Campbell 


392 


H-SC 


232 


N.C. Wesleyan 


328 


H-SC 


323 


Methodist 


335 


H-SC 


389 


Old Dominion 


376 


H-SC 


389 


Randolph-Macon College 


437 


H-SC 


389 


Lynchburg 


396 


H-SC 


312 


Greensboro 


292 


H-SC 


312 


University of Richmond 


301 


H-SC 


398 


Bridgewater 


433 


H-SC 


398 


Ferrum 


405 


H-SC 


398 


Averett College 


426 


H-SC 


295 


Longwood College 


310 


H-SC 


387 


Roanoke College 


387 


H-SC 


387 


Lynchburg 


389 


James Madison Tournament -- 6th Place 




Camp LeJuene Tournament - - 11th Place 




Va. Intercolleg 


iate Tournament — 2nd Place (S.C.) 


O.D.A.C 


. Tournament — 2nd Place 





Lettermen 

G. Beck 
B. Harrison 
M. Pace 
F. Pegram 
S. Sigler 
R. Watson 

O.D.A.C. 

Frank Pegram — First Team 
Stewart Sigler — First Team 



171 




172 



I Team Roster 

Sam Eggleston 
Bob Agee 
Waring Trible 
Taylor Boyd 
Wallace Mahanes 
Dr. Martin 




173 




174 








(10-3) 




H-SC 


18 


Lynchburg 





H-SC 


4 


William and Mary 


14 


H-SC 


11 


Guilford 


7 


H-SC 


17 


Lynchburg 


5 


H-SC 


14 


Virginia Military Institute 


3 


H-SC 


7 


VPI 


11 


H-SC 


2 


St. Mary's 


17 


H-SC 


9 


Virginia Military Institute 





H-SC 


13 


Georgetown 


4 


H-SC 


5 


Randolph-Macon College 


4 


H-SC 


15 


Guilford 


5 


H-SC 


10 


Elon 


2 


H-SC 


10 


Randolph-Macon College 


3 



Lettermen 






R. Bagby 


G. 


Love 


R. Byrd 


J. 


Patton 


B. Calcote 


S. 


Peterson 


B. Carrington 


M 


. Peterson 


D. Corrigan 


B. 


Redd 


B. Coleman 


T. 


Smith 


R. Curtis 


D. 


Unger 


D. Denham 


T. 


Wilson 


J. Farraro 


L. 


Winslow 


F. Francis 


L. 


Woodward 


D. Freeman 






T. Gray 






T. Garner 






T. Horkan 






K. Howard 






M. Johnson 






J. Jones 






M. Joynes 







175 




176 








X H •' f~fc: ••?& 


- -*5L -H 







177 











178 




179 




If 




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ili'iiiiiwlrifl^- 






A 

D 

V 

E 

R 

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I 

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E 

M 

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N 

T 

S 







ergon chairs 



Herman Miller 




D 



Because You Can't 

Work Well If You Don't 

Sit Well. 

The Ergon Chair has been 
designed to the principles of 
Ergonomics, the science 
which studies man's 
relationship to the physical 
environment: The Ergon" 
Chair permits freedom of 
movement in all types of work 
situations. It quickly and 
easily adjusts to fit a full 
range of body shapes and 
sizes. And to combat 
potential health problems 
caused by sitting, the Ergon 
Chair provides exceptional 
spinal support while also 
allowing blood circulation to 
flow without restriction. 



Because You Never Sit Still 




"" exclusively by 



imeRscares$ 



Interior design and furnishings • 300 West Freemason Street • Norfolk, Virginia 23510 • 804-622-5295 



Compliments of 



BARKER - JENNINGS CORPORATION 




P.O. Box 11289 
Lynchburg, VA 24506 



1300 Campbell Circle 
Lynchburg, Virginia 



FIDELITY 




AMERICAN BANK 



NA 



127 N. Main Street 
Farmville, Va 

Helping You Grow . . 
Helps Us Grow . . 



FARMVILLE CREAMERY 

Your Hometown Dairy 


Compliments of 


Distributors of 
MONTICELLO DAIRY 


WWHS-FM 91.7 


PRODUCTS 


The Voice of Hampden-Sydney 


Farmville, Virginia 





184 



Contracts 
$25 =$30 Drycleaning and Laundry 
$50= $60 Drycleaning and Laundry 



One Hour 
Martinizing 



w (. 



•) •) 



The most in Drycleaning 

1 10 South Street 

Farmville, Va 

Across from Farmville 

Shopping Center 

Open 7:30 AM — Close 5:30 PM 

Saturday 7:30 to 2:00 

One-Hour Drycleaning 

3 Hour Shirt Service 





Compliments of 

Walker's Diner 



Open 5:00 AM to 4:00 PM 

Homestyle Meals 

SPECIALS DAILY 

Next door to the Red Lyon 




We wire flowers through FTD 
Compliments of 

Rochette's Florist 



119 North Main Street 
Farmville, VA 
Phone 392-4154 



185 



Compliments of 

The First National Bank 



Farmville, VA 

Your Locally Owned Independent Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Branches 

Farmville Shopping Center 

Route 15 and 460 West 

College Plaza Shopping Center 

Pamplin City, VA 



Always Patronize 

KALEIDOSCOPE 

Advertisers 


Compliments of 

Crutes 


Compliments of 

The Tiger 

The College Newspaper 

Published 22 times yearly 

by the students of H-SC 


School and Office Supplies 

Photographic Equipment and Supplies 

Featuring the Sale and Service of Royal 

Typewriters and Victor Calculators 



186 



o 

OMEGA 

world's most wanted watch 



Martin 
The Jeweler 

Farmville, VA 392-4904 






VIRGINIA 
NATIONAL 
BANK 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 



A STATEWIDE BANKING ORGANIZATION WITH OFFICES ACROSS THE VIRGINIA 

COMMONWEALTH 



187 




PRINTING 

• Letterheads 

• Programs 

• Publications 



THE FARMVILLE HERALD 

Farmville, Virginia 



Traditional Clothes for Men and Women 

120 Fourth Street 
Farmville, Virginia 23901 

R. W. Carter B.S.— '59 




Yes, you 

college men, executives 

who share a common enthusiasm 

for fine quality, tailoring and fit 

SHOP 




Your Favorite Department Store 
That Has Everything 



Compliments of 



Pairet' s 



Your Sporting Goods 
Headquarters 

Farmville, Virginia 



Moore's Distributing 
Company 

Richard H. Moore, Owner 

Wholesale Distributers of 

Bread-Candies-Cigarettes-Paper Cups 

and other goods 



209 S. Main Street 
Farmville, VA 



Telephone 
392-3222 



188 




CARTER'S FLOWER SHOP 



Farmville, Virginia 
392-3151 




Compliments of 



Hampden-Sydney 

Married Students 

Association 



Steve Tedesco, Chairman 
Teri Moore, Secretary 



The Most 

and. 
Title Insj^f 



lawyers Ti 




epresented 
Id 
e Nation 



orporation 

Home Office ~ Richmond .Virginia 
Geo. V. Scott ('28) President 



More than 19,000 Branch Offices, Agents and Approved Attorneys in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. 

A RICHMOND CORPORATION COMPANY 



189 




190 




191 




192 







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193 




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194 



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195 




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196 




197 




s 
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A 
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E 
R 
S 



Hampden 
Fellows 



The Hampden Fellows Program, 
conceived as a stimulating supple- 
ment to the liberal education at 
Hampden-Sydney College, is de- 
signed to bring together distin- 
guished practioners from the world 
of affairs with members of the aca- 
demic world for mutual discourse 
and exchange. Unlike the normal 
speaker, who must come and go too 
quickly for much exchange with the 
audience, each Hampden Fellow 
spent two or more days in residence, 
during which time he or she took an 
active part in the educational pro- 
gram of the College, both formally 
and informally. 

The campus visits were opened 
with an opening convocation in 
which the Fellow presented a formal 
lecture. After this, the format varied 
with the wishes of the individual Fel- 
low and included visits to classes, 
small group seminars, and informal 
discussions. Every opportunity was 
encouraged to allow the Fellow to 
mingle informally with the students 
and faculty, allowing and encourag- 
ing members of the College commu- 
nity to meet personally and ex- 
change ideas with distinguished pro- 
fessionals, whom they will probably 
never come close to knowing. 



All are professionals whose experi- 
ence and intellect enable them to trans- 
cend the limits of a single discipline and 
to address knowledgeably the questions 
fundamental to a life rich in meaning and 
direction, amid the complexity and con- 
fusion of society. 

Curtis Ingham came to Ms. magazine 
from Skidmore College and its Univer- 
sity Without Walls Program in February, 
1973. Working at first as a volunteer in 
the editorial department of the magazine, 
she was hired in June of 1973. Since then 
she has edited the Ms. "Letters" col- 
umn, co-edited the "Found Women" 
column, and edited special features. She 
has lectured at Yale University on Amer- 
ican foreign policy in the Eastern 
Mediterranean; on the women's move- 
ment for two consecutive years at the 
Hotchkiss School; and on women's writ- 
ing, as a special guest lecturer, at New 
York University. She is a frequent guest 
on radio and television programs, as an 
outspoken proponent and apologist for 
the women's movement. 

Interaction Players, a chamber music 
group committed to new ways of sharing 
their total professional and personal ex- 
perience in music, aims to free both the 
artist and his audience from the conven- 
tional limitations of a formal concert 
presentation. In a workshop atmo- 
sphere, through informal lecture- 
demonstrations, inter-disciplinary semi- 
nars, open rehearsals, and free discus- 
sions, along with convential concerts of 
old and new music. Interaction works to 
illuminate the process of making music 
and to integrate it with life experiences of 
the student. Paul Posnak, piano; David 
Sella, cello; and Ethan Sloane, clarinet; 
graduates of Yale University and the Jul- 
liard School, are all award-winning solo 
performers who still retain the capacity 
to blend their virtuoso talents into out- 
standing ensemble performances. Their 
imaginative interpretation and the great 
sensitivity they display toward each 
other and toward their music makes each 
performance a rare and captivating 
event. 



Thomas W. Murray, who practices 
obstetrics and gynecology in Fishkill, 
N.Y., has for most of his career been a 
leader in studies of sterilization 
techniques, hormonal reactions, and 
population growth. An English and Clas- 
sics major at Georgetown University, he 
earned his M.D. from the College of 
Doctors and Surgeons, Columbia Uni- 
versity, in 1965. Since then his interest 
has centered on gynecology. He served 
in the Army as a gynecologist, and is cur- 
rently an attending obstetrician- 
gynecologist at Vassar Brothers Hospital 
in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., where he also 
serves as the assistant director of obstet- 
rical nurses' education. For the last ten 
years he has been a lecturer on popula- 
tion problems at Fordham university in 
New York. 

Hugh S. Sidey, correspondent and 
Bureau Chief for Time magazine, has 
been intimately acquainted with the 
news and newsmaker of two decades. An 
Iowa native, Sidey worked for the 
Omaha World-Herald and Life magazine 
before joining the staff of Time in 1958. 
His current column in Time , "The Presi- 
dency", has earned him wide acclaim 
and respect as a close observer of that 
office and its occupants. Among his pub- 
lished works are the books John F. Ken- 
nedy, President (1963) and A Very Per- 
sonal Presidency; Lyndon Johnson in the 
White House (1968). 

Admiral Stansfield Turner, former 
Rhodes Scholar, now director of the 
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, began 
his education at Amherst College, but 
transferred to the Naval Academy, 
where he graduated with the class of 
1946. In his distinguished naval career he 
has commanded the U.S.S. Home ; a 
carrier task group in the Sixth Fleet; and 
the U.S. Second Fleet. He has served as 
President of the Naval War College and 
as commander-in-chief of Allied Forces 
in Southern Europe (NATO). 



200 



THE 



HAMPDEN 




FELLOWS 



PROGRAM 



CURTIS INGHAM 

Hampden-Sydney is a cultural ghetto/ £■ 
A ghetto in that you're isolated here 
away from what they call "the real 
world"; and I wonder what will become 
of you when you get out there. 

"The Women's Movement: 






.:-;•- 



.V 



; 



Failures, and Goals 



? 5 



si 



^N$m, 10:30 



x> 



VaJM* Se P tem 

^S^/f, Vuditori 




Campus Residen 
September 14-16, 




THE HAMPDEN FELLOWS PROGRAM 

presents 




INTERACTION 
PLAYERS 

Paul Posnak, piano; Ethan Sloane. clarinet; David Sella, cello 




Seminar: "How to Listen to Music" 
September 20-22, 1977 

3 Consecutive Sessions in Parents' & Friends' 
Tues. 9 am, Wed. 9:30 am, Thurs. 9 am 




The really surprising thing about 
Music is for the enjoyment of all: not Hampden-Sydney is its committment to 

just for the handfull who have had the the liberal arts on the one hand and its 

time and the wealth to pursue a formal lack of adequate teachings of "the arts" 

education centered upon it. on the other. 




202 



In Concert 
Thursday, September 22 

8 : 00 pm , College Church 



THE FELLOWS 



HAMPDEN « PROGRAM 




presents 

DR. THOMAS W. MURRAY 

Obstetrician ana Gynecologist 




' 'Can a Woman Be President 
of the United States ? ' ' 

Convocation, 10:30 a.m., 
November 10 - Johns Auditorium 

There are certain intrinsic and 
extrinsic differences between men and 
women that feminists refuse to accept. 
These differences are not necessarily 
bad, but they do exist. The biological ; 
differences are obvious, but also 

^^ s ^^ m « rt bej^ 59lW/ Admissions Policies ' ' 

Lecture-Discussion, 4:30 p.m., November 10 

Parents & Friends 





' 'Population Problems ' ' 

Lecture, 3:00 p.m., November 11 

Parents & Friends 



203 



THE FELLOWS 



HAMPDEN H7Mm PROGRAM 




presents 



HUGH SIDEY 

Washington Bureau Chief for Time magazine 




Politics is a good bit more honest than it 

used to be. 



i J9k -A 



If there is an aristocracy in this 
country, Kennedy was a part of it. Thus 
his presence in the White House was 
distinctive in one more way than most 
students of politics realize. Kennedy was 
the first aristocrat in the White 
since Roosevelt. 




204 



ledy was 

"convocation Address 

' 'The Nature of Leadership ' ' 

Thursday, January 19, 10:30 a. m. 

Johns Auditorium 



THE 
HAMPDEN 




FELLOWS 
PROGRAM 



presents 



Adm. Stansfield Turner 

DIRECTOR OF THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 




1 'The Intelligence Com x 
Problems andPros J 

4:00 p. m. , Parents and Fri 

Thursday, April 20,H 



/t%*/i i/a/i'ft , \i • 




i 6 



New Directions in 1 



Secrecy versus Open 



A new model of intelligence is being 
formed today and openness is apart of this. 
No intelligence agency can be totally open. 
On balance, openness pays off. 




Thursday, April 20, 1978 
Johns Auditorium 



205 









There are many issues on which the 
people should vote by referendum. 
These issues are those of high emotional 
content, and should not be left to the 
state legislature to decide. 



There is no necessity that (the gover- 
nor and It. -governor) be of the same 
party. The It. -governor can be a help to 
the governor if the governor so desires. 
If not, the It. -governor can find other 
means of executive involvement. 



206 



"The Graduates" 

by Campus Comics 




207 



HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE 

Presents 

AN UNPRECEDENTED 




mm 



WITH THREE OF AMERICA'S GREATEST WRITERS 








TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME 



DICKEY, STYRON, AND MORRIS 



Discussing 



II 



THE WRITER'S POWER 



ir 





5 FROMs Hl&iaHKIC' 

police language mis-use in all areas. 
When language is mis-used,, it is a good 
sign that the thought behind the 
statement or action~f5~5D~mewhat lacking. 

MORRIS READING FROM HIS PROSE 

MARCH 31, 9:30 A.M., P&F LOUNGE 



IV 



209 




The Richmond Sinfonia 

Jacques Houtmann Richard Llewellyn Watson 
Musical Director Assistant Conductor 



210 



Jeff MacNelly 



Pulitzer Prize Winning Political Cartoonist 
Author of "Shoe" 




April 24, 1978 




211 



Student Directory 



Abbott, William Lewis (Billy) 

607 Horsepen Road, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Atkinson, Jonathan Garland (Jonathan) 
8330 Audley Lane, Richmond, Va. 23227 



Beck, Steven Edward (Steve) 

2232 Loch Lomond Drive, Vienna, Va. 22312 



Ackermann, Michael Friedrich (Mike) 
Konigsbacher Strasse 6, 67 Ludwigshafen/Rh 
W. Germany 0621-554337 



Adams, James Edward (Jim) 

P.O. Box 161, Brookneal, Va. 24528 



Adams, James Ervin, III (Jim) 

#1 Live Oak, Bergstrom AFB, Texas 78743 

Adamson, Brian David (Brian) 

30 Eastwood Lane, Washington, Pa. 15301 



Adkins, Eddie Michael (Mike) 

152 Blair Place, Danville, Va. 24541 



Atwill, Edward Bennett (Bennett) 

5 Ampthill Road, Richmond, Va. 23226 



Auerbach, Barry William (Barry) 

5237 Sweetbriar Circle, Portsmouth, Va. 23703 



Avison. Terry Anne (Terry) 

P.O. Box 637, Hampden-Sydney, Va. 23943 



Babashak, James Vincent (Babo) 

2830 Linden Lane, Falls Church, Va. 22042 



Baber, Bruce Allenby, Jr. (Bruce) 

96 Settlers Road, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Beecroft, Morris Bryan, III (Bryan) 

22 Spottswood Lane, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Bell, Alexander Herbert. II (Alex) 

1460 Woodhouse Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 

23454 



Bell, Lewis William (Lewis) 

1584 Vance Avenue, Memphis, Tenn. 38104 



Benner, Donald Ray (Don) 

400 Alexandria Pike, Warrington, Va. 22186 



Bennett, Michael Thomas (Mike) 

3220 W. Grove Avenue, Chester, Va. 23831 



Adsit, Samuel Denison, III (Sam) 
1512 Meads Road, Norfolk, Va. 23505 



Bagby, Richard Alan (Rick) 

524 Caroline Avenue, Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Berg, Patrick Wayne (Pat) 

30 Jonas Drive, Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 



Agee, Robert Lee, IV (Bob) 

Route 1. Box 58. Farmville, Va. 23901 



Bailey, Wayne Alan (Wayne) 

323 Burnwich Road, Richmond, Va. 23227 



Berglund, Scott Wesley (Scott) 

5119 Elk Hill Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Akers, Thomas Madagan (Tom) 
93 Lake Shore Terrace, Hardy, Va. 



Baker, Philip Bruce (Philip) 

121 Oakwood Drive, Franklin, Va. 23851 



Bernard, Thomas Rutherford 

901 Overbrook Road, Wilmington, Del. 19807 



Alexander. James Moffatt, III (Jim) 
3113 Savory Drive, Fairfax, Va. 22030 



Ball, David McDowell (David) 

39 W. Cornwall Street, Leesburg, Va. 22075 



Best, Marcellus James, Jr. (Jay) 

1504 E. Walnut Street, Goldsboro, N.C. 27530 



Allen, John William, Jr. (Johnny) 

103 Powhatan Circle, Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Alloway, Jeffrey Alexander (Jeff) 

1 1914 Elkwood Drive, Cincinnatti, Ohio 45240 



Allport, Thomas Page (Tom) 

404 Meadow Lane, Franklin, Va. 23851 



Anderson, John Walton, Jr. (Johnny) 
St. George Avenue, Crozet, Va. 22932 



Anderson. Phillip Verne (Phillip) 
Route 3, Box 245, Chatham, Va. 24531 



Ball, George Gill, Jr. (George) 

2112 Windward Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, 

Va. 23451 



Barnhart, Steven David (Steve) 
924 Boulevard, Salem, Va. 24153 



Barnhill, Ray Curtis (Ray) 

140 Hampton Roads Avenue, Hampton, Va. 23661 



Barrs, David Emest (David) 

Burcher Road, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Bashaw, John Allison (John) 

4416 Rockcrest Drive, Fairfax, Va. 22030 



Birdsong, Warren Lee (Warren) 

1127 Azalea Lane, Stephenville, Texas 



Bishop, Michael Eugene (Mike) 

R.D. 3, Pennington Drive, Duncansville, Pa. 

16635 



Blackford, William DesChamps (Billy) 

135 Shoreham Road, Spartanburg, S.C. 29302 



Blackwell, Kevin Dale (Kevin) 
Route 1, Box 147, Dolphin, Va. 23843 



Blank, Richard Herrod (Rick) 

3409 Beach Drive, Tampa, Fla. 33609 



Apperson, Charles Black (Charlie) 

3368 Richards Boulevard, S.W., Roanoke, Va. 

24018 



Bass, William Dudley (Dudley) 
Riverview Dairy Farm, Route 1, Rice, Va. 
23966 



Blanton, Peter Dillard (Peter) 

20 Rio Vista Lane, Richmond, Va. 23226 



Appich, Donald Leland, Jr. (Donnie) 

8223 Chamberlayne Avenue, Richmond, Va. 23227 



Appleton, Randall Eugene (Randy) 

2809 Meadow Wood Drive, E., Chesapeake, Va. 

23321 



Bateman, Herbert Harvell, Jr. (Herb) 

223 Shoe Lane, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Batliner, Ronald, Jr. (Ron) 

2908 Adam Keeling Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 

23454 



Boatwright, Donald Jeffrey (Jeff) 

3363 Crittenden Avenue, Roanoke, Va. 24102 



Bohannon, Martin Ray (Marty) 

1003 Kenmore Drive, Mechanicsville, Va. 

23111 



Archer, Thomas Boiling (Tad) 

10500 Duryea Drive, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Armstrong, Peter Eaton (Peter) 

1802 Hanover Avenue, Richmond, Va. 23220 



Aron, Alvan Macauley, Jr. (Macauley) 

120 Manchester Avenue, Danville, Va. 24541 



Aron, Scott Simpson (Scott) 

120 Manchester Avenue, Danville, Va. 24541 



Atha, Alan Paul (Alan) 

2302 W. 69th Terrace, Mission Hills, Kansas 

66208 



Bayliss, Philip Martin (Phil) 

16 Burritts Landing, Westport, Conn. 06880 



Beale, Kevin L. (Kevin) 

1111 Wadnea Drive, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



Bean, Joseph Sanborn, Jr. (Sandy) 

4017 Old Leeds Ridge, Birmingham, Ala. 35213 



Beasley, David Terry (David) 
Box 1904, Athens, Ga. 30603 



Beck, Gary James (Gary) 

Route 1, Box 300C, Midlothian, Va. 23113 



Boinest, Jane Pemberton (Pern) 

8910 Tresco Road, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Bond, Stewart Michael (Stewart) 

1506 Wellington Drive, Bedford, Va. 24523 



Bondurant, Benjamin Elliott (Elliott) 
Box 26, Rice, Va. 23966 



Boross, John Michael (John) 

220 Sunset Ave., Hightstown, N.J. 08520 



Boucher, Brian William (Brian) 

704 Centerville Turnpike S., Chesapeake, Va. 

23320 



212 



Bowles. Phillip Cameron (Phil) 

1203 Lee Drive. Farmville. Va. 23901 



Burgess. David William (David) 

124 Hunterdale Rd.. Franklin, Va. 23851 



Caton, Christopher Edward (Chris) 

418 Discorery Circle, Virginia Beach, Va. 



Boyd. Richard Alexander (Dick) 

1531 Monmouth Drive, Richmond, Va. 23233 



Burke, John Duke (Jack) 

900 Blanton Ave., Richmond. Va. 23221 



Chadwick. Robert Gerold (Bob) 

Jockey Hollow Rd., Morristown, N.J. 07960 



Boyd. Taylor Fair (Taylor) 

20 Possum Run. Columbia. S.C. 29206 



Burke, Landon Mason (Landon) 

6005 Beechtree Dr.. Alexandria. Va. 22310 



Challenor, Michael Stanley (Mike) 

9513 Fairlake Lane, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Boze. Blair Manson (Manson) 

209 Locke Lane. Richmond. Va. 23221 



Burks. Gordon Elmo (Gordon) 

8509 Ironington Ct.. Richmond. Va. 23227 



Chiotti, Jean Yves (John) 

299 Rue de Grignan 13300, Salon, France 



Boze, Edward Scott, III (Scott) 

209 Locke Lane. Richmond, Va. 23221 



Burnette. Gregory Fisher (Greg) 

10313 Waltham Dr., Richmond, Va. 23233 



Chou, James T.M. (Jim) 

64 Wan Shou Rd., Mucha, Taipei, Rep. of China 



Bradner. Joseph Pendleton (Joe) 

2911 Vista Point Rd.. Midlothian. Va. 23113 



Burrell. Robert Alton (Robert) 
Route 1, Box 238, Lanexa, Va. 23089 



Christian, Stuart Grattan, III (Stuart) 

17 Greenway Lane, Richmond, Va. 23226 



Bradshaw, Christopher Leroy (Chris) 
8803 River Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Butler. James Chester (Jimmy) 

2958 Hemlock Lane, S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Chu, Stephen John (Steve) 

458 Highfield Rd.. Salem. Va. 24153 



Bradshaw, William James. Jr. (Billy) 
P.O. Box 183. Buckingham. Va. 23921 



Brierre, Roland Theodore, III (Chip) 
7529 Rockfalls Dr.. Richmond, Va. 23225 



Brilliant. Patrick David (Pat) 

4705 Rutledge Rd., Chesapeake. Va. 23320 



Brooks. Paul Harrington (Paul) 
Linden St.. Courtland, Va. 23837 



Brown. Bennie Griffin (Ben) 
P.O. Box 117. Windsor, Va. 23487 



Brown, David Milton (Dave) 

310 Carrsbrook Dr.. Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Brown. Edward Dalton (Tim) 

51 Birch Rd.. Darien. Conn. 06820 



Brown, Edward Farrow (Ed) 

5704 Burr Circle. Mechanicsville. Va. 23113 



Brown. Gordon Bradley (Brad) 

605 Heathfield Rd. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Brown. Orran Lee (Orran) 
Route 1, Forest. Va. 24551 



Brown, Paul Garland (Paul) 

5731 Princess Anne Drive, Mechanicsville, Va. 

23111 



Brown, William Dennis, IV (Dennis) 

2212 Pargoud Boulevard, Monroe, La. 71201 



Byrd. Irving Ray, Jr. (Ray) 

226 Lewis Ave., Salem, Va. 24153 

Cabell. Henry Landon, IV (Bunky) 
Garrison Forest Rd., Garrison, Md. 21117 



Cabell. Mark Harriss (Mark) 
Oakland Farm, Columbia. Va. 23038 



Calcote. Robert Dudley (Bob) 

673 North Shore Dr., Charleston, S.C. 29412 



Caldwell, Stokeley Gray. Jr. (Stoke) 
1632 Center Hill Dr.. Roanoke. Va. 24015 



Camden. Dorman Sherman (Corky) 

507 Haverline Hill. Collincville. Va. 24078 



Cann. Brian Mitchell (Brian) 

5507 Kingsbury Rd., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Canter. John Walter Fitchett (John) 
7809 Cateret Rd., Bethesda. Md. 20034 



Cantlay. Donald Davison (David) 

Av. Jean Van Horenbeeck. 143 1160 Bruxelles, 

Belgium 

Capocelli, Sergio (Sergio) 

2305 Bogan Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Carcelen. Francisco (Francisco) 



Carlucci, Jeffery Van (Jeff) 

329 Bridgeview Circle, Chesapeake. Va. 23321 



Carney. Richard Lee (Rick) 

337 S. French Ct., Virginia Beach, Va. 23454 



Ciucci, Joseph Vincent, III (Jay) 

3515 Warner Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23225 



Clark, Charles Irwin (Charlie) 
Box 257, Kilmarnock. Va. 22482 



Clary, Robert Clinton. Jr. (Clint) 
General Delivery, Valentines, Va. 23887 



Claybrook, Dewey Wayne (Wayne) 
Route 2. Brookneal, Va. 24528 



Clough, David McKay (Dave) 

Route 2. River Rd., Richmond, Va. 23233 



Coffield, Steven Joseph (Steve) 

319 Oak Lane, Richmond. Va. 23226 



Coleman, Gilbert Addison (Gilbert) 
Route 2, Box 293-B. Woodford, Va. 22580 



Coleman, James Bruce (Bruce) 
Box 130, Dublin, Va. 24084 



Colon. Felix (Felix) 

2440 E. 29th Street. Apt. 7H. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

11235 



Cordes. Jeffrey O. (Jeff) 

Saulterview Rd.. Birmingham. Ala. 35209 



Corey, John Edwin (John) 

2301 Windham Rd., South Charleston, W.Va. 

25303 



Corrigan, David Patrick (David) 

311 Gloucester Rd., Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Bryant, Dennis Dickins (Dennis) 
Route 1, Box 205A, Capron, Va. 23829 



Carothers, William Douglas M., Ill (Doug) 
Route 2, Box 322, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Cox, Parke Hunter, III (Parke) 

4343 Bruce Rd.. Chesapeake, Va. 23521 



Buchanan, George Conway (George) 
108 Knollwood Rd., Bristol, Tenn. 37620 



Carpenter. John Townsend (John) 

6501 Sherwood Road. Baltimore, Md. 21239 



Cox. Robert Young (Rob) 

1407 Friend Ave., South Boston, Va. 24592 



Bullard, John Bunyan, III (John) 

4 Partridge Hill, Rt. 2, Richmond, Va. 23233 



Carrington, William Addison (Billy) 

3530 Otter View Place, Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Coyle, Thomas Claiborne Green, Jr. (Tom) 
Box 253, Route 3, Kearneysville, W.Va. 25430 



Bumgardner, George Keller (George) 

311 Spring Lake Rd.. Columbia, S.C. 29206 



Cart. Ben Montgomery. Jr. (Ben) 
Box 100. Cedar Mountain. N.C. 28718 



Cozad, Thomas Michael, Jr. (Michael) 

16 Oak Park Drive, Bettendorf, Iowa 52722 



Burbank. John Morris (John) 

210 Melwood Lane, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Carter, Thomas Fleming (Tom) 
Box 8, Fort Defiance. Va. 24437 



Craddock, John Wimbish (John) 

1994 Link Road. Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Burdell, Joel Barton (Joel) 

1542 Young's Point Place, Herndon, Va. 22070 



Cash, Richard Everett (Ricky) 

7147 Meadowbrook Rd., Lynchburg. Va. 24502 



Craighill, Edward Carrington (Ed) 
1400 Northwood Circle, Lynchburg, Va. 24503 

213 




Denham, Douglas Scott (Doug) 

712 Pennsylvania Ave., Winchester, Va. 22601 



Denitto, Robert Fred (Bob) 

6 Westwood Dr., Fredericksburg, Va. 22401 



Devine, Patrick Campbell (Pat) 

2038 Hunter's Trail. Norfolk. Va. 23518 



Dewey, Frederick Lyman. Ill (Rick) 
902 Stuart Rd.. Wilmington, Del. 19807 



Dickinson. William Andrew. Ill (Bill) 

1228 E. Bay Shore Dr.. Virginia Beach, Va. 

23451 



Dietrich. King Hastings (King) 

2013 Addey Court, Falls Church, Va. 22043 



Dietz, Charles Miller, Jr. (Chuck) 

9 Albemarle Ave.. Richmond. Va. 23226 



Dillard. Lester Layne. Ill (Les) 

1403 Friend Ave., South Boston, Va. 24592 



DiMunno, James Agostiac (Augie) 

2836 Ashwood Dr., Chesapeake, Va. 23321 



Dodd. Ralph Wesley (Ralph) 

6 Tazewell Ave., Cape Charles, Va. 23310 



Doherty. Daniel Keith (Dan) 

923 Wilton Circle, Arbutus, Md. 21227 



Dombalis, Nicholas Constantine (Nick) 
304 Sandalwood Dr., Richmond. Va. 23229 



Craighill, Joseph Laird (Laird) 

10120 Duryea Drive, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Crenshaw, Edgar Hatcher. Ill (Hatcher) 
5010 Cary Street Road. Richmond, Va. 23226 



Crenshaw, Gordon Lee, II (Lee) 

111 Windsor Way. Richmond. Va. 23221 



Crook, Charles William (Chuck) 

1017 Belvedere Dr., Albemarle, N.C. 28001 



Crouch, Donald Ray (Donald) 

Route 1, Box 368, Bedford, Va. 24523 



Crowder, Thomas Mason (Tom) 

1730 Monticello Ave., Petersburg, Va. 23801 



Culbertson, Tracy T. (Trace) 

9706 Greenview Lane, Manassas, Va. 02360 



Cumbey, Thomas Edward (Eddie) 
Route 3, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Cunningham, Hugh Careton. Ill (Ted) 
1402 Gilliam Dr.. Farmville. Va. 23901 



Currie,. William Robert (Bill) 

4223 Hillbrook Circle. Roanoke. Va. 24018 



Curtis, Richard Earl. Jr. (Rick) 

Qtrs. F, Naval Base, Charleston. S.C. 29408 



Curtis, Thomas Webster (Tom) 

2047 Long Pine Drive, N. Springfield, Va. 

22980 



Cutright, Barry Kim (Barry) 

P.O. Box 8, N. Garden, Va. 22959 

214 



D'Agata, Michael Charles (Mike) 

212 Merritt St., South Boston, Va. 24592 



Daly. Clark Jeffrey (Jeff) 

8111 Rosehill Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Daly, Jon Michael (Jon) 

108 Primrose Place, Danville, Va. 24541 



Daniel. Dabney Maury (Dabney) 

Box X, Sweet Briar Col., Sweet Briar, Va. 

24595 



Darden. David Burton (Dave) 
Vistarama Lane. Bedford, Va. 24523 



Darden, William Dunlap (Bill) 

3998 Brockbank Way, Salt Lake City, Utah 

84117 



Davis, Mark McHale (Mark) 

10 The By Way, Bronsville, N.Y. 10708 



Davis. Phillip Gilmore, II (Nappy) 

811 Indian Trail, Martinsville. Va. 24112 



Davis. Richard Andrew (Drew) 
Route 4, Rocky Mount, Va. 24151 

Davis, Thomas Martin (Tom) 

7602 Horsepen Rd., Richmond. Va. 23229 

Dawson, Robert Richard (Bob) 

3940 Darby Dr., Midlothian, Va. 23113 



Day, Hanry Fenton (Fenton) 

134 Sutherlin Ave.. Danville. Va. 24541 



DeFrancesco, Gregory Louis (Greg) 

8433 Kavanagh Rd.. Baltimore. Md. 21222 



Donaldson. Douglas Bayard (Doug) 

288 Oakwood Circle. Danville. Va. 24541 



Dorey, Donald Richard (Don) 

7333 Ruthven Rd.. Norfolk. Va. 23505 



Doudlass. Thomas Griffin (Tom) 

3625 Alamance Dr., Raleigh, N.C. 27601 

Doummar. Richard Habib (Richard) 

P.O. Box 901. 313 22nd St., Virginia Beach, 

Va. 23451 

Driskill, Buford Lee, III (Buford) 

3741 Woodside Ave., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Driskill, William Shearer (Bill) 

3741 Woodside Ave., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Dudley, Oliver Witcher, IV (Witcher) 
4300 Dover Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23221 

Duffer. Randolph Lee, III (Lee) 
Box 253, Keysville. Va. 23947 



Dunaway. John Clopton (John) 
Route 4, Box 220. Seaford. Del. 19973 



Durham, Lucian Archambault, III (Bucky) 
3130 West Ridge Rd., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24014 

Eagan, John Gardner, Jr. (John) 

5440 Poplar Hill Dr.. Norfolk. Va. 23502 



Earhart, Joe Boyd (Jay) 



East, Jack Andrew (Andy) 

1645 Yates Dr.. Merritt Island, Fla. 32952 



Economos. Demetri (Demetri) 

214 Georgetown Rd., Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Edwards, Anthony Michael (Mike) 
3221 Grove Ave.. Chester, Va. 23831 



Edwards. William Henrv. Jr. (Will) 

P.O. Box 92. Rectory Rd.. Montross. Va. 22520 



Eggleston. Sam Daniel (Sam) 

PX>. Box 317, Lovingston. Va. 22949 



Eidson, Arlen Glenn, Jr. (Glenn) 

5545 Princess Anne Rd.. Virginia Beach, Va. 

23462 



Elliott. Lewis Frazier (L.F.) 

1311 Bernarn St.. South Boston. Va. 24592 



Emerick, Paul Theodore (Paul) 

18336 Shavon Rd., Triangle, Va. 22172 



English. Richard Edd. (Rick) 

8211 Whistler Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23227 



Epperson, Richard Presley. II (Richard) 
1000 7th Ave.. Farmville. Va. 23901 



Emouf. Roderic Edward (Rod) 

202 Second Ave., Farmville, Va. 23901 



Evans, Gilbert Russell (Rus) 

1300 Templar Boulevard. Norfolk, Va. 23518 

Face, James Michael (Jimmy) 

9522 Ridgefield Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Fararo, John Joseph, Jr. (Jack) 

21 Edward Dr.. Hightstown, N.J. 08520 



Fariss, Frank Marcus (Marcus) 
Route 4. Box 231, Bedford. Va. 24523 



Farmar. Richard Aubrey. Ill (Rick) 
P.O. Box 396. Warsaw, Va. 22572 



Farmer. Neil Page (Neil) 

210 N. Mooreland Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23229 



Farthing. Stephen Daniel (Steve) 

237 N. Raleigh Court. Danville. Va. 24541 



Fauth, Gerald William (Gerald) 

8209 Burning Tree Rd.. Bethesda, Md. 20034 




Fay, Richard Michael (Mike) 
Wannamaker Ct.. Spartanburg, S.C. 20302 



Feinman. Michael Stuart (Mike) 

1621 Belfield Place. Lynchburg. Va. 24503 



Feld, Alan David. Jr. (David) 
4235 Bordeaux, Dallas, Tx. 75205 



Fitzpatrick, Timothy Martin (Tim) 

7 Colony Boulevard, Apt. 208, Wilmington, 

Del. 19802 



Fletcher, David Harry (David) 

214 High St., St. Albans, W.Va. 25177 



Floyd. Barton Lee (Bart) 

11424 Rolling Brook Rd., Chester, Va. 23831 



Folio. Craig Anderson (Craig) 

1207 Country Club Dr., Greensboro, N.C. 27408 



Foster, Robert Dixon (Dixon) 
Box 385, Irvington, Va. 22480 





L 



tt 




Fout, Paul Douglas (Doug) 
Box 346. Middleburg. Va. 22117 



Fox, Preston Stuart (Preston) 

Route 5, •■Holly Hollow". Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Fox, William Trent (Trent) 
Foxhill, Capron. Va. 23829 



Fralin, Charles Randolph (Randy) 

10601 Cherokee Rd., Richmond, Va. 23235 



Francis, Joseph Thomas. Jr. (Tom) 
Route 1, Box 69, Dry Fork, Va. 24549 



Francis. Robert Ford (Ford) 

1543 Clark Rd., Charleston, W.Va. 25314 



Freeman, Douglas Sykes (Doug) 
Route 1, Box 87, New Hope, Pa. 18938 



Freeman. William Long (Bill) 

Route 1, Box 87, New Hope, Pa. 18939 




Fuller. Drew Robinson, Jr. (Drew) 

274 Wt. Wesley Rd.. Atlanta, Ga. 30305 



Fulton, Christian Langdon (Chris) 

323 Wister Rd., Wynnewood, Pa. 19096 



Fulton, Frank Hundley, Jr. (Frank) 
503 Holbrook Ave., Danville, Va. 24541 



Feldmann, Gregory West (Greg) 

2102 Wycliffe Ave., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Ferguson, James Deari (Jimmy) 

1089 Timberlake Dr., Lynchburg, Va. 24502 



Ferrara, Clifford G. (Clifford) 

13 Legare St., Charleston, S.C. 29401 

Ferrara, Martin Ellerbe (Martin) 

13 Legare St., Charleston, S.C. 29401 



Ficklen, Fitz-Hugh Conway (Fitz) 

Route 3, Box 327C, Wilmington, N.C. 28401 



Fidler, John Edwin (John) 

Bx. 146, 5 Starbuck Rd.. Summersville, W. Va. 



Fine, Henry Stuart (Henry) 

1202 Loch Lomond Court, Richmond, Va. 23221 



Finney, Mark Spencer (Pockets) 

5607 Wesley Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21207 



Fisher, Roland Luis, Jr. (Ron) 

11421 Rolling Brook Rd., Chester, Va. 23831 



Gammon, Tracy Watkins (Tracy) 

1222 Fillman Drive, Reidsville, N.C. 27320 



Garner, Thomas Arthur (Tom) 

Route 5, Box 470, Lynchburg, Va. 24501 



Gary, Stuart Thomas (Stuart) 

2680 West Park Drive, Baltimore, Md. 21207 



Gates, David Heath (David) 

4701 Bruce Road. Chester, Va. 23831 



215 



Gielow. Harold Richard (Harold) 

P.O. Box 275, Greenwich Road. Westfield 

Center, Ohio 44251 



Hamer, Frederick Charles, III (Chuck) 
203 Devon Road. Charlottesville. Va. 22901 



Haw. John Sheppard. Ill (Shep) 

505 Ridge Top Road. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Glisson, John Wesley (John) 

8514 Chippenham Road, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Godbold. Frank Blackwell. Ill (Frank) 
1312 Willingham Street. South Boston. Va. 
24592 



Godfrey, Rustin Burt (Rusty) 

505 Buffer Court, Virginia Beach. Va. 23462 



Godfrey, Thomas Walter, Jr. (Tom) 

3122 Bray Road. Virginia Beach. Va. 23462 



Godfrey. Thomas Walter. Jr. (Tom) 

3122 Bray Road. Virginia Beach. Va. 23452 



Hamnett, Lawrence Dean (Larry) 

13 Farmer Drive, Allentown. N.J. 08501 



Hancock, William Joseph (Bill) 

311 S. Washington Street. Winchester, Va. 

22601 



Harcum. Michael Stephen (Mike) 

7511 Woodley Road. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Hardy. William Edward 

8811 Wishart Road, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Hare. Ransom Bryant, IV (Bryant) 

3425 Gorman Drive, Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Hayes. Richard Burton. Ill (Richard) 
914 Milledge Road. Augusta, Ga. 30904 



Heery. Thomas Moss (Rusty) 

2815 Jefferson Road. Athens. Ga. 30601 



Heldreth. Joseph Brown, III (Joe) 
1012 Jefferson Circle. Martinsville. Va. 
24112 



Helms. Crampton Harris. Jr. (Trucky) 
1741 Morningside. Morristown, Tenn. 37814 



Henley. Richard Alan (Ricky) 

11604 Brendonridge Lane. Richmond. Va. 23233 



Goldstein, Gary Brien (Gary) 

138 Bennington Road, Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Gonzalez, Amauri G. (Amauri) 

4740 NW 196 Terrace. Miami. Fla. 33055 



Harrington. David Merle (David) 

P.O. Box 131. Patterson St.. Ext.. China 

Grove. N.C. 28023 



Harris. David Wayne (Bubba) 

3021 Lakewood Road. Glen Allen. Va. 23050 



Henrv. Robert Randolph. IV (Ran) 

930 Heatherwood. Bluefield. W. VA. 24701 



Henry. Timothy Ira (Tim) 

1317 Harrison Street, Lynchburg, Va. 24504 



Good. Russell Warden (Ward) 

3741 Darby Drive. Midlothian. Va. 23113 



Harris. James Selden. Jr. (Sel) 

500 Brunswick Ave.. Blackstone. Va. 23824 



Heppner. David Alexander Spotswood (David) 
617 Bon Air Circle, Lynchburg. Va. 24503 



Goode. Thomas Emory (Thomas) 

5430 Dorchester Road. Richmond. Va. 23225 



Graham, David Gillen (Dave) 

222 Oakdale Road. Baltimore. Md. 21210 



Harris. Richard Dean (Dick) 

461 Sherwood Forest Road, Winston-Salem. N.C. 

27104 



Harris, Robert Charles Powell (Robbie) 

1719 Haskins Street, South Boston, Va. 24592 



Hicks, Horace Rowe, Jr. (H.R.) 

Route 4. Box 310-A. Glen Allen, Va. 23060 



Hinkle. Henry Newsom (Henry) 

2857 Merry Acres Lane. Winston-Salem, N.C. 

27106 



Graham. John Robert (John) 

1808 Wakefield Road. S.W.. Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Harrison. William Edward (Billy) 

4021 Old Leeds Ridge. Birmingham. Ala. 35213 



Hobbs. Gelon Sylvester (Trip) 

603 N. Broad Street. Suffolk. Va. 23434 



Gray, Thomas Paul (Tom) 

7829 Aiken Avenue. Baltimore. Md. 21234 



Hatcher. Robert Vance, III (Trey) 

1 Ampthill Road. Richmond. Va. 23226 



Hofler. John Gatling. Jr. (John) 

215 Drummond Drive. Raleigh. N.C. 27609 



Green. Steve Goodman (Steve) 

Route 2, Box 319-D. South Boston, Va. 24592 



Haugh. David Roberts (David) 

P.O. Box 1216. Charlottesville. Va. 22902 



Hogg. Charles Mathew. Jr. (Mat) 
Route 2. Pohatan. Va. 23139 



Green. Thomas Watkins (Tom) 
Route 2. Clarksville. Va. 23927 



Haw. David Morrison (David) 

505 Ridge Top Road. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Hoke. James Michael (Michael) 

10250 Cherokee Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23235 



Greer. Billy Louis (Billy) 

604 Sirine Ave.. Virginia Beach. Va. 23462 



Groseclose, Robert Daniel (Dan) 

1565 Stewart Street, Welch, W. Va. 24801 



Groseclose, Samuel Lee (Sam) 

1565 Stewart Street. Welch. W. Va. 24801 



Grover, Robert Ellis (Bob) 

2406 N. Augusta Street. Staunton. Va. 24401 



Gunn. Robert Bruce (Bruce) 

972 Kenleigh Circle, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

27015 



Haar, Frederick Hubbard. Jr. (Fred) 
"The Quarters", Old Garth Road. Charlottes- 
ville. Va. 22901 



Haga, David Shotwell (David) 

2104 Link Road, Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Hale, Thaddeus Henry (Henry) 

401 Patton Ave.. N.W.. Roanoke, Va. 24016 



Haley, Gregory Joseph (Greg) 

3727 Peakwood Drive, S.W., Roanoke, Va. 

24014 

216 




Holcombe. Wayne Calvin (Wayne) 

2143 Cunningham Drive. Apt. 103. Hampton. Va. 

23666 



Holder. David Wayne (Dave) 

207 E. Charlotte St.. Sterling. Va. 22170 



Holgate. Louis Howard (Louis) 

35 Phillips Dr.. Leesburg, Va. 22075 



Holston. Walter Brown. Ill (Chip) 

3738 Woodside Ave.. Lynchburg. Va. 24503 



Holt. David Powell (David) 

1141 N. Hampton Rd.. Petersburg, Va. 23803 

Holz. Jack Anderson (Jack) 

Ten Pilgrim Rd.. Darien. Conn. 06820 



Horkan. George Anthony. Ill (Tony) 
Cleremont Farm. Upperville. Va. 22117 



Hotchkiss, Carter Walker (Carter) 

7602 Foxhall Lane. Richmond. Va. 23228 



Howard. Kevin Michael (Kevin) 

192 Green view Dr.. Dolver. Del. 19901 



Howlett. Bobbv Lewis. Jr. (Bobby) 
233 E. 40th St.. Norfolk. Va. 23504 



Huddle. David Franklin (David) 

814 Cresthill Rd.. Fredericksburg. Va. 22401 



Huff, Leigh Preston. Jr. (Leigh) 

615 Camilla Ave., Roanoke. Va. 24014 



Hughes. Samuel Louis (Sam) 

1010 Randolph Lane, Lynchburg. Va. 24502 



Hughes. William Carrington. Ill (Bill) 
P.O. Box 33. Gordonsville. Va. 22942 



Hughev. Stephen Lovce (Steve) 

10301 Cherokee Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23235 



Hull. William Vance (Vance) 

1102 Magnolia Ave.. Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Hundley. James Jay (Jav) 

1750 Edwin St.. Winter Park. Fla. 32789 



Hunt. Albert Monroe. Jr. (Al) 

8110 Lake Pleasant Dr.. Springfield. Va. 22153 



Hunter. Edward Sidney. Ill (Sid) 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd.. Virginia Beach, Va. 

23455 



Huntley. Louis Ward (Ward) 

1632 Plainfield Ave.. Orange Park, Fla. 32073 



Huskey. Daniel Alan (Danny) 

502 Putney St.. Farmville, Va. 23901 



Huskey. Robert Blain. Jr. (Bobby) 
411 Buffalo St.. Farmville. Va. 23901 



Irby. John Pindexter. IV (Bucky) 

3611 Alamance Dr.. Raleigh. N.C. 27609 



Ireland. Scott Brown (Scott) 

3328 Hermitage Rd., Birmingham. Ala. 35223 



Irving. Frederick French (Fred) 

4618 Apache Ave.. Jacksonville, Fla. 33210 




■ A ' fci 



Jacksonville. Thomas Micajah, Jr. (Tom) 
Route 1. Box 83, Austinville. Va. 24312 



James. Franklin Jefferson (Jeff) 

245 Florida Ave., Portsmouth, Va. 23707 



Jervey, James Drewry (Jim) 

901 North High St.. Franklin. Va. 23851 



Jervey. William Altvater (Bill) 
901 High St.. Franklin. Va. 23851 



John. James Edward (Edward) 

White Gate Farm, Route 2. Charlottesville, 

Va. 22901 



Johnson. Allen Easley, Jr. (Easley) 

3219 White Oak Rd.. S.W., Roanoke. Va. 24014 



Johnson, Charles Lunsford (Lunsford) 
1641 Varina Ave.. Petersburg. Va. 23803 



Johnson, Richard Mark (Mark) 

1416 Woodhouse Rd., Virginia Beach, Va. 

23454 



Johnson, Robert Bay (Bob) 
Rockcastle Ave., Crewe, Va. 23930 



Johnson, Todd Carrington (Todd) 

1603 Hearthglow Lane, Richmond, Va. 23233 



Johnston, David King (David) 

209 Hale St., Pearisburg. Va. 24134 



Johnston, Kenneth Moffet (Ken) 

118 Ware Rd., Williamsburg, Va. 23185 



Jones. Benjamin Edward (Ben) 

128 Gatewood Ave., Crewe, Va. 23930 



Jones. Bernard Ogburn (Bernie) 
Church St., Alberta, Va. 23821 



Jones, Jack Spessard (Jack) 
Box 57. Arvonia. Va. 23004 



Jones, James Monroe, III (Jim) 



128 Gatewood Ave., Crewe, Va. 23930 



Jones. William David (Bill) 

585 River Rd., Hinckley, Ohio 44233 



Jordan. Daymon Roy (Day) 

195 Pioneer Ct., Athens, Ga. 30601 



Joynes, Louis Napoleon, II (Mike) 

1320 Penguin Circle, Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Junes, Bobby John (Bobby) 

1509 Hearthglow Lane, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Karo, William Andrew (Drew) 

1403 Libbie Ave., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Kasun. John Matthew (Matt) 

9003 Colesbury Place, Fairfax. Va. 22030 



Kavit. Gary Stuart (Gary) 

5001 Monument Ave., Richmond, Va. 23230 



Keane, David Alfred (Dan) 

203 Ralston Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Keffer, Robert Franklin (Bob) 

1014 Oakmont Circle, Lynchburg, Va. 24502 



Keeley, Thomas Patrick (Tom) 

510 28th St.. S.W.. Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Kenna, Timothy Erich (Tim) 

9350 Lakeside Dr., Vienna, Va. 22180 



Keesling, John Carl (John) 

127 Hickory Rd., Sterling. Va. 22170 



Keller. Scott Green (Scott) 

2 Stuyvesant Rd., Asheville. N.C. 28803 



Kelley, Jeffery Glenn (Jeff) 

8354 W. Weyburn Rd., Richmond. Va. 23235 



Kelley, Joseph Crockett, Jr. (Joe) 
Route 2. Box 271, Wytheville, Va. 24382 



Kelly, James Warren (Jim) 

4629 Fort Ave., Lynchburg. Va. 24502 



Kelsey, Philander (Phil) 

Box 337 H-SC, Hampden-Sydney, Va. 23943 



Kent, Anthony Wayne (Tony) 

408 Loudoun Ave., Waynesboro. Va. 22980 



Kerns, Trent Sydnor (Trent) 

408 September Dr., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Key. Phillip Winfry (Phillip) 

117 Virginia Ave., Danville, Va. 24541 



Kiely, Craig Procter (Craig) 

Oakes Road & Ivms Place, Rumson, N.J. 07760 



Kilgour, Kenneth Litton (Ken) 

Route 4, Box 161-C, Leesburg, Va. 22075 



Killgore, John Kendall (Kendall) 
P.O. Box 176, Killen, Ala. 25645 



Kim, Taeho (Taeho) 

Blue Ridge Sanatorium. Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 

217 



Kirby, Wade Howard Osborne (Wade) 

Box 334, Claremont Manor, Claremont. Va. 23899 



Lee, Gordon Condon (Gordy) 

712 Cassell Lane, Roanoke. Va. 24014 



Marchetti, Joseph Peter, Jr. (Joe) 

4185 Traylor Drive, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Kiser, Marshall Kent (Kent) 

2929 Oak Grove, Bluefield, W.Va. 24701 



Leming, Joseph Atkins (Joe) 

3516 Linden St., Bethlehem. Pa. 18017 



Markham, Patrick Graham, III (Pat) 
Box 9999 Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia 



Kelin, David Alan (David) 

1724 Wilbur Rd., S.W.. Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Levering, Cary Cooper (Cary) 

332 Lexington Road, Richmond, Va. 23226 



Marks, Dale Talmadge (Dale) 
Route 1 Box 169, Capron, Va. 23829 



Kohler, James Christian (Christian) 

Berliner Weg 6. 6308 Butzbach 11, W. Germany 



Levy, Richard Glenn (Rich) 

44 Palmer Green, Baltimore, Md. 21210 



Marks, Daniel Camp (Camp) 

Route 1, Box 169, Capron. Va. 23829 



Koroneos, Erik Andreas (Erik) 

3613 Traylor Drive, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Lewis, John Boiling, III (Boiling) 

7709 Sweetbriar Road, Richmond. Va. 23229 



Martin, Frank Conrad (Frank) 

3015 Avenham Ave., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Kyle, Jonathan Lee (John) 

322 Duncan Street, Ashland, Va. 23005 



Lewis. Keith Wayne (Keith) 

508 S. Woodberry Ave., Danville, Va. 24541 



Martin, John Albert (John) 

914 Oakwood Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Koyle, Gideon Musoke (Gideon) 
Box 6002, Kampala, Uganda 



Light, Philip Nelson (Philip) 

1209 Brandon Ave.. Norfolk. Va. 23507 



Mason, Carroll Allen, Jr. (Allen) 

12611 Easthampton Drive. Midlothian, Va. 23113 



Lacy, William White, Jr. (Bill) 

835 Curtiswood Lane, Nashville, Tenn. 37204 



Linares, Francisco Jose (Frank) 

1990 W. 57th St., Apt. 1206, Miami, Fla.33012 



Mason, Gary David (Gary) 

2345 Paddock Lane, Reston, Va. 22091 



Lamond, Craig Garvin (Craig) 

Star Route B, Box 8, Staunton, Va. 24401 



Little, Clark Walworth (Clark) 

6 Holly Drive. Newport News, Va. 23601 



Mastropaolo. Jonathan D. (Jon) 

3409 Surrey Lane, Falls Church, Va. 22042 



LaMotte, David Hyde. Jr. (David) 

4509 Hunter's Circle, Portsmouth. Va. 23703 



Landreth, William Ross (Bill) 

455 Andergren Drive, Harrisonburg, Va. 22801 



Lapp, Richard Lester (Rick) 

541 Dommerich Drive, Maitland, Fla. 32751 



Laughlin, Carl Daniel (Dan) 

1401 Riversedge Road, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Laughlin, Peter Scott (Peter) 

1401 Riversedge Road, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Laumann, Gerald Edward (Jerry) 

837 Mt. Pleasant Road, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

Laux, Jerome Eugene (Jermoe) 

1743 Kingsway Road, Norfolk, Va. 23518 



Lawler, Douglas Reed, Jr. (Doug) 

3000 NW 113th Ave., Sunrise, Fla. 33323 



Litton, James Bowen (Jimmy) 
Route 2. Wytheville. Va. 24382 



Livingston, Robert Elford, Jr. (Bob) 

1248 Glenn St.. West Columbia, S.C. 29169 



Long, Christopher Shepherd (Chris) 

831 Arlington Circle, Richmond, Va. 23229 



Long, William Martin (Marty) 

216 Country Club Road, Newport News, Va. 23606 



Longerbeam, Mark Bryant (Mark) 
RFD 1, Box 14-A, Berry ville, Va. 22611 



Love, Charles Keith (Keith) 

P.O. Box 62 V, Route 3, Chase City, Va. 23942 



Love. Gregory Goode (Greg) 

2715 Meriwether Drive. Charlottesville, Va. 22901 



Lucey, David James (David) 

6830 Woodridge Drive, Norfolk, Va. 23518 




Lawrence, Frank Bernard (Frankie) 

84 St. Anne Circle, Ormond Beach. Fla. 32074 



Lumpkin, William Benedick, III (Billy) 
8332 Chelmford Road, Richmond, Va. 23235 



Maxa, Timothy Scott (Tim) 

2417 Commonwealth Drive, Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Lea, Richard Hunter (Dick) 

1746 Lafayette Circle, Rocky Mount, N.C. 27801 



Mack. Edward Tinsley (Ed) 

Route 3, Box 235, Orange, Va. 22960 



McAbee, Emest Andrew (Ernie) 
Route 1, Box 200, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Leach, Edwin Randolph (Randy) 

109 Trailwood Drive, Forest City, N.C. 28043 



Maclin, Henry Wilson. Ill (Henry) 

Spring Hill. Farmington. Charlottesville, Va. 22901 



MaCahey, Michael Scott (Mike) 

3815 N. Albemarle St., Arlington, Va. 22207 



Leach, Michael Keith (Keith) 

109 Trailwood Drive, Forest City. N.C. 28043 



Mahanes. Wallace Shipley (Wallace) 

1211 Mowbray Place. Charlottesville, Va. 22901 



McChristian, Steven Craig (Steve) 
P.O. Box 321, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Leach, William Chalmers (Bill) 
P.O. Box 780, Leesburg, Va. 22075 



Mahoney, Robert Kevin (Kevin) 

525 Warhawks Road, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



McCulloch, Scott Hedrick (Mayor) 

536 Woodlawn Ave., Beckley, W. Va. 25801 



Leach, William Kendall. Jr. (Ken) 

109 Trailwood Drive, Forest City, N.C. 28043 



Malone, Walter Joseph. Jr. (Walter) 

2513 Hood Drive, Virginia Beach, Va. 23454 



McCulloch, Orgain Edward, III (Mac) 

412 Lighthouse Drive, North Palm Beach, Fla. 

33408 



Leake, Armond Buck, Jr. (A.B.) 

5628 Darlington Road, Richmond, Va. 23234 



Manger, Walter E. (Walt) 

5906 Dewey Drive, Alexandria, Va. 22310 



McDonald, Timothy Patrick (Tim) 

4402 Holly Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Leary, John Wesley (Wes) 

411 49th St., Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Mansfield, John Earl, II (John) 

1650 Riverside Drive, Gainesville, Ga. 30501 



McElwee, Douglas Carleton (Doug) 

1418 Sweetbrier Road, Charleston, W. Va. 25314 



218 



McEwen, James Charles, II (Jim) 

1641 Wilton Rd.. Petersburg, Va. 23803 



Miles, Randolph Parker (Randy) 
Box 502. Mathews, Va. 23109 



Moorhead, Scott Logan (Scott) 

200 Paxton St., Lexington, Va. 24450 



McGehee. William Overton (Overton) 
Box 132. Palmyra, Va. 22963 



Miles. William Scherer (William) 

2215 Wedgewood Ave.. Richmond, Va. 23228 



Morehead, Ralph Connor, IV (Chip) 

1603 Tredegar Ave., Catonsville, Md. 21228 



McKenney. Charles Russell (Russ) 
5000 Fox Ridge Rd.. Roanoke, Va. 24014 



McKenney. Malcolm Stuart. Jr. (Stuart) 
4716 Pocahontas Ave., Richmond. Va. 23226 



McKinnon, Michael Leigh (Mike) 

715 Camp Perrin Rd.. Lawrenceville, Ga. 30245 



McMahon, James Moore (Moore) 

3210 Kensington Ave.. Richmond. Va. 23221 



McManaway. Clayton Lee (Lee) 

2766 Thorndale Ave., Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Mell, John Aldous (John) 

412 D. Moncastle Rd., Greensboro, N.C. 28748 



Mellen, Seth Baldwin. Ill (Seth) 

151 Peachtree Bettle Av., N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 

30305 



Menendez, Joseph Vincent (Joe) 
507 Laurel St.. Empiria, Va. 23847 



Merrell. Robert Baxter (Bob) 

Route 1. Box 92H. West Point, Va. 23181 



Miller, Harland Lamar. Ill (Hal) 

Channel Club Towers PH 1. Monmouth Beach, 

N.J. 07750 



Miller, William Sheppard, III (Shep) 

6100 Eastwood Terrace, Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Modlin. Robert Christian (Rob) 

906 Talbot Dr., Smithfield, Va. 23430 



Moles. Jeffrey William (Jeff) 

Route 3. Box 121, Vinton. Va. 24179 



Molster, John Sanford (John) 

302 Greenway Lane, Richmond. Va. 23226 



Moore, Charles Ferrell. Ill (Chip) 
1206 Graydon Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23507 



Moore, John Augustus, Jr. (John) 

503 Evergreen Rd., Rocky Mount, N.C. 27801 



Moore. Julian Adair, Jr. (Jay) 

P.O. Box 391. Front Royal. Va. 22630 



Moore. Wallace Warren (Wally) 

115 Mulberry Rd.. Danville, Va. 24541 



Morgan, William Hunter, Jr. (Bill) 
P.O. Box 176, Sunbury, N.C. 27979 



Morris. Mark John (Mark) 

203 Tamarack Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23229 



Morris, Reginald Philip (Reggie) 
11612 Boyd Rd., Chester, Va. 23831 



Munden. Gordon Ward, Jr. (Gordon) 
2649 Sandpiper Rd., Sandbridge, Va. 23456 



Murphy, Andrew Philip, III (Drew) 
1815 Edgehill Dr., Alexandria, Va. 22307 



Murphy, Wyatt Rorer, Jr. (Rory) 

4715 Old Dominion Dr.. Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Myers, Averette Perry, Jr. (Perry) 
Box 96. Alberta, Va. 23821 



Nerney, Michael Edward (Mike) 
15 Marina Rd.. Hampton, Va. 23669 



Newcomer. David Jackson (David) 

8804 Three Chopt Rd., Apt. 102. Richmond, Va. 

23229 



Mikell. William Gaillard, Jr. (Gig) 

117 Somerset Rd., Wilmington, Del. 19803 



Moore. William Spurr (Bill) 

1831 East Boulevard, Petersburg. Va. 23803 



Newell, William Willard (Bill) 

201 Starmont Dr.. Danville, Va. 24541 




Newell. Wilson Bennett. Jr. (Ben) 
201 Starmont Dr., Danville. Va. 24541 



Newman, William Crenshaw, IV (Shaw) 
8714 Old Spring Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23235 



Newton, David Emory (David) 

1811 LeSuer Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Nexsen. Walter Randolph (Randy) 

948 Rothowood Rd., Lynchburg. Va. 24503 



Nichols, Jerome Smith, III (Jerry) 
Route 3, Box 539, Troutville, Va. 24175 



Niedermayer. Herbert William, III (Bill) 
9211 Donora Dr., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Noftsinger, Dabo Clifton (Dabo) 
Box 488, West Point, Va. 23181 



Norrington, George Dyer (George) 

601 Kingston Dr.. Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



Ogle, David Godon (David) 

127 Londonberry Rd., Forest, Va. 24551 



O'Hanlan, Edward Vincent (Ted) 

854 Shawnee Rd., Waynesboro, Va. 22980 



Old, Wayne David (Wayne) 

St. Brides Rural Station, Chesapeake, Va. 23322 



Oldfield, Robert Wise (Bob) 

5316 Rolfe Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Oliver. Mark Hunter (Mark) 

5703 Littlehorn Dr.. Roanoke, Va. 24018 



219 



Orlandi, Joseph Orazio (Joe) 

4109 Kanawha Ave., S.E., Charleston, S.C. 25304 



Penick. Joseph Bernard (Joe) 
Box 7508, Richmond, Va. 23231 



Revell, Everett Carroll. Jr. (Everett) 
P.O. Box 157, Onley, Va. 23418 



Osgood, Thomas Wentworth (Tom) 

1023 Northampton Rd., Petersburg, Va. 23803 



Peters, Paul Dillard (Paul) 

1805 Country Club Rd., Connersville, Ind. 47331 



Revercomb, Randolph Champman (Randy) 
3528 Penarth Rd., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Outten, Joseph Fendall, Jr. (Jeff) 

130 Rockingham Rd., Greensville, S.C. 29601 



Peterson. Mitchell Paul (Mitch) 

151 Glen Oban Dr.. Arnold, Md. 21012 



Rhea, Michael Anthony (Mike) 

Route 4, Box 485A, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Overton, John Gregory (John) 

8915 Sierra Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Peterson, Scott Richard (Scott) 

151 Glen Oban Dr., Arnold, Md. 21012 



Rhodes. John Richard (John) 

17 Dudley Street, Presque Isle, Me. 04769 



Owens, Andrew Dow, Jr. (Andy) 
740 Prospect Ave., Pulaski, Va. 24301 



Phillips, Bruce Collier (Rocky) 

409 September Dr., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Richards, James Ronald (Jim) 

4612 Locksview Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Owens, Edward (Ed) 

2222 Jeffress Buvd.. South Boston. Va. 24592 



Pitzer, Charles Lewis, III (Chuck) 
2609 Stanley Ave., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Richards, Mark Irvin (Mark) 

140 Trinkle Av., N.E., Roanoke, Va. 24012 



Pace, Gerald Michael, Jr. (Mike) 
106 Lewis Ave., Salem, Va. 24153 



Plunkett, William Gordon (Bill) 

4301 Alfriends Trail, Virginia Beach. Va. 23455 



Richardson, Joseph Cumming (Pancho) 

211 Mountain View, Bluefield, W. Va. 24701 



Pananas, Jonathan Socrates (Jon) 
Route 3, Box 556, Orange, Va. 22960 



Poehler, Dennis Christopher (Denny) 
4822 Coleman Rd., Richmond, Va. 23230 



Richmond, William Dickenson (Bill) 

11 Hickory Ridge, Martinsville, Va. 24112 



Pandaleon, Alec Andrew, III (Alec) 
Six Sargent Rd., Scarsdale. N.Y. 10583 



Pollock, Andrew Jesse (Andy) 

4210 Newport Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Riddle, Barry Lynn (Barry) 

Route 1, Box 50, Gladys, Va. 24554 



Pantele, William James (Bill) 

8956 Tarrytown Dr., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Porter. Chester David, III (Chester) 
3130 Darnley Dr.. Richmond, Va. 23235 



Ritch, Frederick Field, III (Fritz) 

663 Otis Boulevard, Spartanburg, S.C. 29302 



Pappas, John Stephen (John) 

387 Woodbridge Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 14214 



Porterfield, David Latimer (Dave) 
342 Fox Dr., Winchester, Va. 22601 



Roberts, William Shackelford (Robin) 
4 Kings way Court., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Parker, Richard Carlyle (Richard) 
1880 Garraux Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 30327 



Power, John Maynard (John) 

1141 Larchmont Crescent, Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Robertson, James Edward (James) 
Route 1. Burkeville, Va. 23922 



Parker, Wilbert Joel (Manie) 

222 Haraway Rd., Danville, Va. 24541 



Preas. George Robert, II (Geep) 

4937 Hunting Hills Dr., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Robertson. Theodore Andrew (Ted) 

1611 Wilmington Ave., Richmond, Va. 23227 



Parsons, Bradley Jay (Brad) 

27 Appomatax, Dr., Brentwood, Tenn. 37027 



Preston, Thomas Lewis (Tommy) 

46 Canterbury Rd.. Charlottesville, Va. 22901 



Rodman, Judson Howard, Jr. (Howard) 
4705 Thornwood St., Portsmouth, Va. 23703 



Patterson, Joseph Rody, Jr. (Joe) 
Route 1, Box 8, McKenney, Va. 23872 



Patterson, Mark Whitehead (Mark) 

1303 Langhorne Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Patterson, Paul Tulane (Tulane) 

1303 Langhorne Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Patterson, Vernon William, III (Vernon) 
105 Partridge Ct., Spartanburg, S.C. 29302 



Price, Douglas Sumpter, Jr. (Doug) 
P.O. Box 174, Gretna, Va. 24557 



Quarles, Foster Kevin (Kevin) 

25 Woodbury Forest Dr., Hampton, Va. 23666 



Quarles, John Morton, Jr. (Johnny) 

Box 344, Anchorage Lane, Yorktown. Va. 23490 



Quinn, Warren Arthur (Warren) 

7820 Chapman Rd., Kingsville, Md. 21087 



Rogers, John Charles (John) 

1536 Little Horseshoe Dr., Virginia Beach, Va. 

23451 



Rose, Robert John (Robert) 

1437 Fentress Rd., Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



Rosebro, Robert Rutherford (Rob) 

8005 Carriage Lane, Richmond. Va. 23229 



Rosen, Allen Wayne (Allen) 



Patton, James Doddridge, IV (Jay) 
2400 Walhala Dr., Richmond, Va. 23235 



Ramsey, Stuart Craig (Craig) 

32 Audubon Pond Rd., Hilton Head Island, S.C. 

29928 



Rosenberger. William, II (Bill) 
Box 417, Waynesboro, Va. 22980 



Paul, Ray Mercer, Jr. (Ray) 

4818 Stuart Ave., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Paulette, Bennett Wayne (Bennett) 
Route 1, Appomattax, Va. 24522 



Payne, Andrew Allemong, III (Drew) 

1420 Louden Heights Rd., Charleston, W. Va. 

25314 



Randolph, Philip Ruffin (Randy) 

Route 1, Box 295, Mechanicsville, Va. 23111 



Rawles. Georgina Offley (Gigi) 

5001 Cary Street Rd., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Redd, William DeHart (Red) 

Box 92D, Route 1, West Point, Va. 23181 



Ross, Robert Douglas (Doug) 

845 Cottonwood, Dr.. Severna Park, Md. 21146 



Ross, Robert Tayloe (Robert) 

3517 Tilden St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20008 



Ross, Scot Andrew (Scot) 

11781 Bollongbrook Dr., Richmond, Va. 23235 



Pearson, Robert Knight, Jr. (Robbie) 

4313 Montgomery Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Reed, Randy Wayne (Randy) 

9322 Huron Ave., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Rowe, Andrew Carlton, Jr. (Andy) 

6011 Wanda Dr.. Mechanicsville. Va. 23111 



Peebles, James Fain (Fain) 

110 East 5th Ave., Lawrence ville, Va. 23868 



Reinhart. Robert Steven (Steve) 

3415 Summerville St., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Rummel, Mark Christopher (Mark) 
P.O. Box 125, Tomahawk, Wis. 54487 



Pegram, Frank LeCraft (Frank) 

1014 Johnson Ave., Petersburg, Va. 23803 

220 



Rennolds, David Winston (David) 

6410 Three Chopt Rd., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Ruoff, Peter Edward (Pete) 

3726 Dalebrrok Dr., Dunfries, Va. 22026 



Rusher. William DeWill. Jr. (Bill) 

8 Westham Parkwayi Richmond, Va. 23229 



Rustin. Raiford Herrin (Raiford) 

136 Broad St.. Charleston, S.C. 29401 



Rutledae, Dennis Joseph (Dennis) 

193 Forest Lawn Dr.. Danville. Va. 24541 



4633 Bruce Rd., Chester, Va. 23831 



Shepherd, Robert Jackson (Bob) 

2621 Cornwallis Ave.. Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Sherrod. David Burton (David) 

Route 10, Box 10, Sanford. N.C. 27330 



Stiebel, Christopher Miles (Chris) 

2908 Irisdale Ave.. Richmond, Va. 23228 



Stokes, Gordon Kavanaugh (Gordy) 
5334 Edge water Dr.. Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Stokes, John Randolph (Randy) 

5334 Edge water Dr., Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Sadighian. Jim John (Jim) 

147 Buena Vista Circle. South Hill, Va. 23970 



Sherrod. Stanley Marc (Marc) 

Route 10. Box 10, Sanford, N.C. 27330 



Stokes, Thomas Lane, Jr. (Tom) 

5334 Edgewater Dr., Norfolk, Va. 23508 



Saeer, William Laird, Jr. (Laird) 

150 Virginia Ave., Danville. Va. 24541 



Salsbery, Lee Kent (Lee) 

7801 Elba Rd.. Alexandria. Va. 22306 



Sargeant, Charles Preston (Preston) 



Shipp, Andrew Rucker (Andy) 

918 Lake Drive, Bedford, Va. 24523 



Sigler. Stewart Marshall (Stewart) 

1503 Fairway Place, Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Silvester. Donald Wilhelm (Don) 

3250 Faragut Ct., Falls Church, Va. 22044 



Stoneburner, Frank Dew, Jr. (Hank) 
301 Ralston Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Stonnell. William Patrick (Pat) 

Route 4, Box 461. Farmville, Va. 23901 



Stough. John Arthford, Jr. (John) 

609 Maryhill Lane. Louisville, Ky. 40207 



Saunders, Amos Charles, Jr. (Amos) 

115 Winifred Dr.. Totowa Boro. N.J. 07512 



Silvestri. Vincent Louis (Vincent) 

14014 S. Carriage Rd., Midlothian, Va. 23113 



Sudduth, Robert Lee, IV (Skipp) 

449-A Hermitage Dr., Danville, Va. 24541 



Sawyer, Leslie R., Jr. (Skip) 

516 Forest Rd.. Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



Sims, Christopher Lee (Chris) 

4110 Clagett Rd., Hyattsville, Md., 20782 



Suter, Owen Edward, III (Owen) 

14 Charnwood Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Schein, Daniel Bradley (Danny) 

2735 E. Little Creek Rd., Norfolk, Va. 23518 



Sketchley, Rothwell Garset, III (Garsed) 
3219 Kensington Ave.. Richmond, Va. 23226 



Sutton, Richard Sidney (Rick) 
Box 13. Boydton, Va. 23917 



Schoenhut, Scott Edison (Scott) 

P.O. Box 1517, Henderson, N.C. 37536 



Slack. Daniel Martin (Daniel) 

1079 14 Avenue Dr., Hickory, N.C. 28601 



Talley, Cecil Trent, Jr. (CT.) 

Route 1, Box 461, South Boston, Va. 24592 



Schoonover. Jon Robert (Jon) 

5206 Moseley Rd.. Moseley, Va. 23120 



Slone. Noel Blaine (Noel) 

617 11th St., Radford, Va. 24141 



Talley, Gerald Spencer, Jr. (Spence) 
1517 Jonquill Dr., Richmond, Va. 23233 



Sehrum, Owen Lester, III (O.L.) 

Route 1, Box 80-D. Providence, N.C. 27315 



Smith. Paul English (Paul) 
Box 250, West Point, Va. 23181 



Taylor, James Creede, III (Tay) 

715 South Vi&w Terr., Christiansburg, Va. 24073 



Schuessler, Wesley (Wes) 

266 Guy St.. Roanoke. Ala. 36274 



Smith. Samuel Edward, Jr. (Sam) 

1005 N. Quintana St., Arlington. Va. 22205 



Taylor, James Roger (Jim) 

1409 Dawn Dr., Bedford, Va. 24523 



Schumacher, Michael George (Mike) 

861 Carroll Rd.. Charleston. W. Va. 25314 



Smith, Stephen Clark (Steve) 

125 Prince George Dr., Hampton, Va. 23669 



Taylor, Joseph Dodson (Joe) 

1105 Rose Lane, Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Screven, John Slade (Slade) 

3568 River Bend Rd.. Birmingham. Ala. 35243 



Smith. Timothy Andrew (Tim) 

1924 Belleville Rd.. S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Taylor, Phillip Aaron (Phil) 

4623 Hanover Ave., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Seay, Kevin Payne (Kevin) 
P.O. Box 79. Dillwyn. Va. 23936 



Smith, Walter Powell, III (Walter) 
209 Antioch Dr., Sandston, Va. 23150 



Taylor, Robert Baird, Jr. (Rob) 

3610 Manton Dr., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Seay, Paul Delano, Jr. (Paul) 
P.O. Box 79, Dillwyn, Va. 23926 



Senter, Frederick Forrest (Forrest) 
511 Marlowe Rd.. Raleigh, N.C. 27609 



Seymour, William Francis, IV (Will) 
2015 Conte Dr.. Midlothian, Va. 23223 



Shaner. Michell Dahl (Mitchell) 
Route 5, Lexington, Va. 24450 



Snead. Lawrence Rucker, III (Rucker) 

2314 South Lander Lane, Charleston, S.C. 29407 

Snidow, Robert English (Bobby) 

3895 Peakland Place. Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Snyder. Edward Philip (Ed) 

1272 Pickwick Lane, Salem, Va. 24153 



Sommers, John Edward, III (John) 

11830 Chapelwood Lane, Houston, Tex. 77024 



Taylor, William Mills, Jr. (Bill) 

919 Wellington, Winston-Salem, N.C. 27106 



Tazewell, Edmund Bradford, III (Brad) 

1335 N. Bayshore Dr., Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Tedesco, Steven Kent (Steve) 

1735 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg, Va. 23801 

Terry, David Russell (David) 

6814 Providence Rd.. Matthews, N.C. 28105 



Shaw, Charles Stephen, Jr. (Steven) 

1111 Arcturus Lane, Alexandria, Va. 22308 



Sparrow, James Callen (Callen) 

2524 Heathermoor Rd., Birmingham, Ala 35223 



Thomas, Vincent Graves (Vince) 

7321 Barberry Lane, Norfolk, Va. 23505 



Shelly, William Allen (Bill) 

676 Willow Oaks Boulevard, Hampton, Va. 23669 

Shelnut. Willie Robert, II (Willie) 

1231 Westridge Circle, Lynchburg, Va. 24502 



Shelton, Michael Murrell (Mike) 
Route 1. Forest, Va. 24551 



Shelton. William Rhea (Rhea) 



Springer, Joseph Resse (Joe) 

Route 1, Box 187, Warrenton, Va. 22186 



Spurgin, Gerald Brenna (Gerald) 

311 S. Alabama Ave., Deland, Fla. 32720 



Squire, Peter Weaver, Jr. (Weaver) 
428 Laurel St., Emporia, Va. 24007 



Stephenson, William Cowell, IV (Bill) 
P.O. Box 1600, Roanoke, Va. 24007 



Thompson, Bruce Everett (Bruce) 
5123 Holden St., Fairfax, Va. 22030 



Thompson, Fred Douglas, Jr. (Fred) 
Route 3, Box 171-C, Windsor, Va. 23487 



Thompson. James Christian, Jr. (Jim) 
1504 Jonquill Rd., Richmond, Va. 23233 

Thompson, James King, Jr. (Jay) 
6414 Studley Rd., Mechanicsville, Va. 23111 

221 




Thompson, Mark Wootton (Mark) 

3438 Rilman Rd., N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 30327 



Tucker, Royster Milton, III (Royster) 

1223 Devonshire Ave., High Point, N.C. 27260 



Waldrop, George Stephens (George) 
2825 Avenham Ave.. Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Thompson, Robert Bruce, Jr. (Bob) 

113 Commonwealth Circle. Charlottesville, Va. 

22901 



Thompson. Warren Michael (Warren) 
Route 3, Box 171-C, Windsor, Va. 23487 



Thornhill, Clarence Edward (Pete) 
1016 Federal St., Lynchburg, Va. 



Thornton, Joseph Dailey (Joe) 

1806 Mt. Vernon Rd., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Thornton, Michael Alexander (Mike) 
Route 1, Box 209, Forest, Va. 24551 



Thornton, William Cary (Bill) 
Route 1, Box 209, Forest, Va. 24551 



Thurston, Brian Milbank (Brian) 



Tucker, Stanley Holland (Stan) 

11 Tapoan Rd.. Richmond, Va. 23226 



Turner, Harold Ratcliffe (Harold) 

311 Sandlewood Dr., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Turner, James Michael (Mike) 

2600 Ellerbee Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23228 



Twentyman, Scott Shelton (Scott) 

3643 N. Harrison St.. Arlington. Va. 22207 



Tyler, John Alan (John) 

1000 Forest Ave.. Richmond, Va. 23229 



Underwood, John Mason, II (John) 

303 Pendleton Lane. Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 



Unger. Daniel Vernon (Dan) 

5010 Falcon Ridge, Roanoke, Va. 24010 



Walke. John Wistar (John) 

1036 Oakwood, Dr., Roanoke, Va. 24015 



Wall, Barrye Langhorne (Barrye) 
Route 3, Box 568, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Wall, Steven Edward (Steve) 

507 First Ave., Farmville. Va. 23901 



Wall, Thomas Craven (Bob) 

410 Country Club Dr.. Lexington, N.C. 27292 

Wallace, James Weldon (James) 

1017 Ridgemont Dr.. Staunton, Va. 24401 



Ward, David Bruce (David) 

8803 Badger Dr.. Alexandria, Va. 22309 



Ware, Richard Lee (Richard) 

9303 Ledbury Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Tiernan, Edward Lawrence (Ed) 

8619 Greeley Blvd., Springfield, Va. 22152 



Utt, James Warren, Jr. (Warren) 
5542 Valley Dr., Roanoke, Va. 24018 



Warinner, Edwin Douglas, Jr. (Doug) 

8211 Shannon Hill Rd.. Richmond. Va. 23229 



Tignor, Keith Randall (Keith) 

3202 Abelia Rd., Richmond, Va. 23228 



Van Ness, Douglas Hart (Doug) 

8505 Hanford. Dr., Richmond. Va. 23229 



Watkins. Franklin Parker, Jr. (Frank) 
8904 Bellefonte Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Tindall, Russell Glen (Rusty) 

9101 Willowbrook Dr., Richmond, Va. 23228 



Varboncoeur. Francis Gary (Francis) 
P.O. Box 248, West Point, Va. 23181 



Watkins, William Norman (Will) 
P.O. Box 81, Farmville, Va. 23901 



Tipton, Charles S.M. (Charley) 
2504 Brighton Ct., Vienna, Va. 22180 



Vincent. Harry Benjamin. Jr. (Benny) 
307 Oak Hill Dr., Emporia, Va. 23847 



Watson, David Paul (David) 

Route 6, Box 75X, Farmville. Va. 23901 



Traynham, Randolph Edmunds (Randy) 
309 Tennessee Ave., Crewe, Va. 23930 



Waddell, Thomas Carter (Carter) 
16 N. Wirt St., Leesburg, Va. 22075 



Watson, Douglas Charles (Doug) 
Route 3, Box 39. Farmville, Va. 23901 



Trible. Waring, Jr. (Waring) 
"Johnsville", Dunnsville, Va. 22454 
222 



Wadsworth, Joseph Allison Cannon, III (Joe) 
1532 Pinecrest Rd., Durham, N.C. 27705 



Watson, Peter Robins (Pete) 

107 Forest Rd., Oxford, N.C. 27565 



Watson. Robert Jacob. Jr. (Robbie) 
702 Lakeside Dr.. Emporia, Va. 23847 



Wayt, James Twyman (Jim) 

815 N. Island Dr.. Atlanta. Ga. 30327 



Weaver. James Burgess (Jim) 

909 Indian Trail, Martinsville. Va. 24112 



Webb. Bruce Allen (Bruce) 

2833 Cleave Dr.. Fall Church. Va. 22042 



Webb. Charles Houston (Chuck) 
5233 Alleman Dr.. Orlando. Fla. 32809 



Webb. Dwight Marvin (Dwight) 

600 Windomere Ave.. Richmond. Va. 23228 



Wells. Michael Stanford (Mike) 

205 Andover Place. Danville. Va. 24541 



West. David John (David) 

560 Brokenbaugh Rd.. Chesapeake, Va. 23220 

Western. Clinton Frederick. Jr. (Clinton) 
Route 2. Dogwood Lane. Vinton. Va. 24179 

Whealton, Edward Gordon, Jr. (Eddie) 

1005 Trestman Ave.. Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 



White. Charles Mayfield. IV (Chuck) 
416 S. Main St., Warrenton. N.C. 27589 



White. David Ellington (David) 

Route 2, Box 63A. Charles City, Va. 23030 



White. James Wheeler (Jay) 

Hillcrest Dr.. Madison Heights. Va. 24572 



White. Robert Graham. Ill (Graham) 
113 Church St.. Edenton. N.C. 27932 



Whitehead. James Arthur. Jr. (James) 
2217 Parker Ave.. Portsmouth. Va. 23704 



Whitehouse. Robert Putnam (Rob) 

4418 Williams Rd.. Lynchburg. Va. 24503 



Whitt, Robert Holt. Jr. (Bob) 

417 S. Woodberry Ave., Danville. Va. 24541 

Whyte. Orrin Oliver (Orrin) 

Avalon Ridge Rd., Accokeek, Md. 20607 



Wilcox. Thomas Floyd (Tom) 

1802 Rolling Hills Circle, Charleston, W. Va. 25314 



Wildman. Walter Davis (Davis) 

12 Hillcrest Dr., Newport News, Va. 23606 



Wilkerson. Paul Gregory (Greg) 

5604 Ashfield Rd.. Alexandria, Va. 22310 



Williams. Joel Emmett (Joel) 

Route 1. Box 221. Sutherland. Va. 23885 



Williams. Roy Edgar. Jr. (Roy) 

1427 Jackson St., Covington. Va. 24426 



Willis, Larry David (Larry) 

143 Riverpoint Cresent, Portsmouth, Va. 23707 



Willis, Richard Turner Pratt (Richard) 

1 106 Princess Anne St., Fredericksburg, Va. 22401 



Willman. Gerald Frederic, Jr. (Will) 




203 Colonial Ct.. Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Wilson, Norwood Williams, III (Tripp) 
Coggins Pt. Farm. Hopewell, Va. 23860 



Wilson. Robert Major (Bob) 

5950 Telegraph Rd., Alexandria. Va. 22310 



Winburn. William Alfred, IV (Billy) 
2601 Atlantic Ave.. Savannah. Ga. 31405 



Wingfield. William Carter (Bill) 
Route 5, Box 527. Bedford. Va. 24523 



Winks, George Franklin, III (Frank) 
10252 Iron Mill Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Winslow, Leonard Francis, III (Leonard) 
Route 3. Box 27, Charlottesville, Va. 22901 



Wirth. Gordon Wolfgang (Gordon) 
6184 Steeplechase Dr., Salem. Va. 24153 



Witt, Brian Kendall (Brian) 

724 Hayes Dr., Lynchburg. Va. 24502 



Wolanski, Edward Theodore (Ed) 
Route 2, Box 475, Staunton, Va. 24401 



Woodley, James Kendrick, III (Ken) 
101 Grattan Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 



Woodward, Lawrence Hunter, Jr. (Larry) 
Walters, Va. 23481 



Wootton, Frank Taylor, III (Taylor) 

1468 Wakefield Dr., Virginia Beach, Va. 23455 



Wrenn. Robert Cochran, Jr. (Bob) 
304 Church St., Emporia, Va. 23847 



Wright, George, IV (George) 

321 Lexington Rd., Richmond, Va. 23226 



Wyatt, Dale Ricky (Rick) 

507 N. Armistead, Apt. 301, Alexandria. Va. 22313 



Wyeth, Peter Lydon (Pete) 

6711 Wimbleton Est. Dr., Spring, Texas 77373 



Yates, Mark Edwin (Mark) 

Route 4, Box 391, Nathalie, Va. 24577 



Zedaker. Samuel Eric (Eric) 
Box 278, Melfa, Va 23410 



Ziglar, Joseph Maxton, Jr. (Joe) 
110 Beach Rd.. Hampton, Va. 23664 



Students entering second semester. 



Blackwell, Carl Fleming (Carl) 

6124 St. Andrews Lane. Richmond, Va. 23226 



Burge, Frank Tucker (Tucker) 

4113 Old Leeds Lane, Birmingham, Ala. 35213 



Clark. Mark Morgan (Mark) 

Fleets Bay Rd., Kilmarnock, Va. 22482 



Granger. William Woodard, III (Billy) 
155 North Harbor Dr., Chicago, III. 60601 



Gunn, Michael Lee (Mike) 

628 Delaware Ave., Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 



Harris, John Thadieu, III (Thad) 
P.O. Box 86, North, Va. 23128 



Hylton, Douglas Gray (Doug) 

P.O. Box 352, Ronceverte, W. Va. 24970 



Jeanes, John Kohler (John) 
Walnut Hills, Orange. Va. 22960 



Lester, James Cary, Jr. (Cary) 

3021 Rosalind, Ave., S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24014 



Moore, David Edwin (David) 

2208 Woodcrests Est.. Wheelersburg. Ohio 45694 



Nexsen, Walter Randolph (Randy) 

948 Rothowood Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 24503 



Pananas, Jonathan Socrates (Jon) 
Route 3, Box 556, Orange, Va. 22960 



Patterson, Joseph Rody, Jr. (Joe) 
Route 1. Box 8, McKenney, Va. 23872 



Rustin, Rudolph Byrd, III (Dolph) 

P.O. Box 83, Wilson's Mills, N.C. 27593 

Salazar, Vincent Delfin (Vince) 

3422 White Oak Ct., Fairfar, Va. 22030 



Tan, Loon-Kar (Loon-Kar) 

101 Campbell St., Penang, Malaysia 



Terraneo, Robert Phillip (Bob) 

43 Birchwood Rd., Old Tappan, N.J. 07675 



Terry, John Carr (John) 

P.O. Box 218, Peterstown, W. Va. 24963 



Vranian, Steven Craig (Craig) 

6000 W. Club Lane, Richmond. Va. 23225 



Wolcott, James Mounts. Ill (Jim) 

7310 Barberry Lane, Norfolk, Va. 23505 



Students on the exchange program. 
Lucey, D.J. 
Seymour, W.F. 
Goodin, Mark 



223 





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225 



&7i£y fflasnfet/ert/ - dyt/na^ (jomsriunifyfs; SPacf? or SPa//aaf 



Let me preface my following remarks 
by saying that Hampden-Sydney College 
has inspired in me a love of learning and 
an appreciation for beauty and the arts. I 
have benefitted not only from the indi- 
vidual attention and challenges of the 
classroom, but also from the opportunity 
to participate in sports and become in- 
volved in student government. In other 
words, I would not trade my four years 
on the Hill for anything: Hampden- 
Sydney has given me a pride and purpose 
in life and for that I am very thankful and 
indebted to the College. 

In the twilight of my college career it is 
perhaps appropriate then to ponder over 
and reflect upon my education here at 
Hampden-Sydney College. What have 
been the rewards, benefits, and disap- 
pointments? What are the strengths and 
weaknesses in our institution? For it is 
only in this balancing of the good and the 
bad that we can come to appreciate the 
real value and essence of the Hampden- 
Sydney experience. 

The past four years have seen this col- 
lege implement a more demanding aca- 
demic curriculum and a tougher grading 
policy. A serious student concerned 
about obtaining a top-flight, and broad- 
gauged education has that unique oppor- 
tunity here at Hampden-Sydney. Most 
professors here not only maintain and 
demand high academic standards and 
performance, but are also keenly con- 
cerned with the welfare of each indi- 
vidual student. 

There seems to be every reason for op- 
timism. The college has come under new 
and capable leadership; the fraternity 
system is beginning to come to grips with 
its responsibilities to the community 
which stem ultimately from the extensive 
rights and privileges it enjoys; ground 
has been broken for a beautiful, com- 
prehensive and sorely needed athletic 
complex; Graham Hall as a student 
center is near completion; and the whole 
campus seems charged with electricity in 
anticipation of more and more progres- 
sive change. For these reasons the 
Hampden-Sydney man, whether he be a 
student, professor, or administrator, 
should be above all else a gentleman — 
proud, competitive, scholarly, and wil- 



ling to defend the traditions and venerate 
the heritage of his institution. However, 
this condition of things is often hampered 
by a general problem the symptoms of 
which permeate the whole campus com- 
munity — the lack of a total commitment 
and dedication to the purpose of this in- 
stitution, that is the education of honor- 
able men. These symptoms are evi- 
denced at times by our indifferences to 
human weaknesses, cutthroat classroom 
tactics, self-interest, and a lack of regard 
for the property and personal rights of 
others. The fabric of the "close-knit 
community" about which we often boast 
and give hypocritical lip-service has been 
damaged and we must make an united ef- 
fort to mend this imperfection in order to 
keep alive our professed ideals of honor 
and brotherhood. 

Without brotherhood or an attitude of 
camraderie the concept of "gentlemen of 
honor" cannot persist or endure. Be- 
cause Hampden-Sydney has always been 
a small school, a "prevailing spirit of 
friendliness" has given rise to this con- 
cept of espirit de corp or brotherhood. 
And it is only through this sense of 
brotherhood that honor can be ascer- 
tained and realized. This ideal of honor, 
however, is an intangible and therefore it 
requires a faith and dedication by all to 
make it work. Dr. T.E. Crawley sum- 
marizes the point by stating, "No painful 
effort — no honor — no brotherhood." 
Ideally, the notion of honor here at 
Hampden-Sydney should become sec- 
ond nature to her sons and offer them a 
way of life. However, we have failed to 
wholeheartedly pursue this ultimate goal 
and as a result our tradition can some- 
times be seen floundering in a sea of 
hypocrisy and mockery. 

When I speak of honor and brother- 
hood and community friendliness, I am 
not simply speaking of breaches of the 
Honor Code such as cheating and steal- 
ing; but rather I am also referring to the 
wanton destruction of school property, 
the lack of respect for ladies, the ad- 
ministrative undermining of the educa- 
tional process, the pandering to wealth 
and influence which compromises our in- 
tegrity, and the lack of loyality to 
Hampden-Sydney and its noble pur- 
poses. It is only with a total commitment 
by the College community that our 



Honor System and all that it stands for 
can become more than just words but it 
can become the trancending spirit or 
ideal to which we all aspire. How do we 
fail to meet the challenge of creating men 
of honor? 

It is a simple and very obvious fact 
that many of the students that come to 
Hampden-Sydney come merely to have 
fun and put off the real world for four 
more years. When I was a senior in high 
school, a student at Hampden-Sydney 
told me that if I came to the Hill, I 
wouldn't get that much studying done, 
but I would have a good time. It has 
often been said that Hampden-Sydney 
College is just a country club where you 
have to make some grades (dues) to stay 
in. This kind of reputation and student 
attitudes are devastating and have prob- 
ably done more damage than we will ever 
know. Because Hampden-Sydney is a 
private institution, it accepts a large 
population of men who are extremely 
well off and some of them, to put it 
bluntly, are spoiled rotten, having no re- 
spect for the rights and property of 
others. These attitudes not only under- 
mine any concept of brotherhood and 
separate the student body into various 
factions who hold each other in con- 
tempt, but also, they give the people on 
the outside a very poor impression of our 
institution. But perhaps the most serious 
perversion of the brotherhood and honor 
within the student body occurs when 
fraternal loyality is used as an excuse to 
shelter and protect dishonorable deeds 
by a few members within a fraternity. 
This is a "flawed Fellowship" and it 
"destroys every shred of respect" for 
each participating member as well as for 
the whole fraternity. "Honor is indis- 
pensible to any true brotherhood." 

The most shocking failure on the part 
of the faculty is the total lack of respect 
and loyalty a few members have for 
Hampden-Sydney and her ideals. It 
seems that certain professors consider 
their employment and teaching here only 
as a means to collect a salary — their re- 
lationship to the College is incidental. 
Arbitary and unfair grading techniques, 
indifference to individual student needs 
and weaknesses, and egotistical self- 
interest plague and demean the heroic 
dedication to Hampden-Sydney exhi- 



226 



bited by most of our faculty. All these 
negative things serve to effectually pre- 
clude the realization of community 
friendliness, thus undermining any sense 
of brotherhood. The faculty and adminis- 
tration are the men and women who must 
set the high examples of excellence for 
the men who come to Hampden-Sydney 
in order that they may become "Humane 
and lettered men." 

The very purpose of our administra- 
tion is to facilitate the educational ex- 
periences and this can only be ac- 
complished by office policies that pro- 
mote good- will, cooperation, and direc- 
tion. However, it is all too often the case 
that certain officers of our administration 
evidence ideals quite the opposite of 
these, and serve to undermine the very 
purposes and preachings of this College. 
Frequently, students and faculty are 
given the impression that these few ad- 
ministrative officers are doing them 
some enormous favor by simply doing 
the required duties of the position. And 
although it is necessary for a private in- 
stitution to tap various financial re- 
sources, I think it is very important for 
our administration not to compromise 
our principles and succumb to the temp- 
tations and promises of affluent suppor- 
ters who at times try to exert their influ- 
ence on every phase of college life from 
admissions to the punishment of a Honor 
Code violation. 

I am extremely proud of my associa- 
tions with Hampden-Sydney College and 
I am passionately dedicated to the firm 
foundation and sound principles upon 
which she rests and from which she 
draws strength. These ideals are sacred 
and undisputed, but our methods and in- 
tensity of our efforts toward the pursuit 
of these high aspirations will always bear 
examination. President Josiah Bunting 
summarizes this notion best when he 
writes that "Great men have lived and 
worked here, allied in great purposes, 
dedicated to noble things," and there- 
fore, we must always strive to make our- 
selves worthy of this heritage and this 
place. 

William DeHart Redd '78, was President of the 
Student Body during 1977-78, a member of the 
football team, and co-captain of the lacrosse team. 



What do we mean when we say that Hampden-Sydney 
aims to produce "well-rounded" men? The phrase is 
hackneyed now, isn't it? It's been used to death, bled white of 
its meaning. It's not only hackneyed and used to death, it's 
been bastardized. Bastardized by the hundreds of colleges 
and universities that use the ideal of the well-rounded man, 
the Renaissance man, as a loop-hole. You've heard it all be- 
fore: "No, we don't have core requirements here," or "No, 
we don't require a foreign language here," or "No, we're not 
that single-minded about academics here; our mission is to 
produce 'well-rounded individuals'." 

Hampden-Sydney could be (and if it's not, then it should 
be) one of the last bastions of well-roundedness, where the 
ideal is not bastardized, where it's kept in the proper perspec- 
tive, where, as one professor recently put it, "The social and 
athletic development of students is important, but neverthe- 
less secondary." 

Secondary to what? Secondary to the intellectual cultiva- 
tion of our students. That's what college is all about, right? 

Hampden-Sydney's purpose, historically, has been to edu- 
cate "good men and good citizens in an atmosphere of sound 
learning" — a purpose to which Hampden-Sydney has re- 
mained steadfast. There is, however, perhaps no better time 
than this new year of reaffirmation and renewal to reaffirm 
and renew our dedication to Hampden-Sydney as an institu- 
tion of the most serious intellectual intentions, an institution 
where academics are the sine qua non — "a real hotbed of 
ideas". For if worst came to worst, Hampden-Sydney could 
survive without fraternities or football, without the Tiger or 
the Glee Club. But we could not long survive without books 
and chalk and sharp-minded professors and dusty old class- 
rooms with desks bolted to the floor. 

Let Hampden-Sydney always nurture men who play hard 
— in fraternity houses as well as on athletic fields — but, 
vastly more important, let this College always nurture men 
who study even harder than they play. 

Martin M. Sherrod, '76, is the Director of Communications for 
Hampden-Sydney College. He is the Editor of the Record , the publication 
from which this article was taken. I thank him, as editor, for allowing this 
reprint. 



227 




228 




** 



229 



DOES IT TAKE A SPECIAL KIND OF 

STUDENT TO BE HAPPY AT 

HAMPDEN-SYDNEY? 

That's the way the question was asked 
to me, and I think there can be but one 
true answer: yes. It takes a person who is 
willing to go the distance, able to run not 
against others but in competition with 
himself, and eager to stretch his legs. 
Which is to say, it is, maybe, the same to 
be happy at Hampden-Sydney as it is to 
be happy at Oxford or at Southside Vir- 
ginia Community College. Happiness is 
not a finish line but a matter of placing 
one foot in front of the other, knowing 
that the best one is not always forward. 

Most folks, said Abraham Lincoln, are 
about as happy as they make up their 
minds to be. Lincoln's wisdom easily ex- 
tends across more than a century and 
many miles of mountains and prairie, 
since human nature anytime and any- 
where is the same. We have folks here, 
not preppies or jocks or heads, and they 
are governed during their term on this 
lonely and cloud-patched globe by the ir- 
refutable natural laws of which 
Hampden-Sydney has nothing to do and 
yet has everything to do. 

For a select group of men for four 
youthful years this place is home. And so 
the freshman is awed, a rootless young 
man on the edge of an abyss for which he 
has no filler, no bridge, and no vision to 
see the other side. He knows only that he 



230 



(9/1/ QBem^y Iffafefaf 



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must find substance to fill the mammouth 
emptiness before him, and that the best 
way out is through. The Hampden- 
Sydney freshman is armed only with the 
flimsy tools he brought from home with 
which he must build himself a world to 
fill the aching void which stares at him in 
a chipped Venable bathroom mirror. He 
has his catalogue and he has new text- 
books and the blessings of his parents in 
whose care he drove through fraternity 
circle on a bright homecoming day when 
he was in high school. And he has things 
to do, but he finds time to be sad. On the 
fourth or fifth day he rests, and his new 
friends make him happy. 

He returns a sophomore, a wise fool 
who knows everything about his college 
and little about himself. He knows that 
certain aspects of the educational pro- 
cess are to be respected and others ig- 
nored, he knows that to be a fraternity 
man is "awesome" and he knows he will 
sometimes have to be alone. He knows 
where Morton Hall is and occasionally 
stares at a freshman with a strange look 
containing both contempt and empathy. 
He is happy when he drives past the 
Hampden-Sydney sign and he is joyous 
when he sees his friends. On his second 
night back he drives to the Red Lyon and 
eats later at the Truck Stop. 

The days weave together in a multi- 
scopic tapestry of alarm clocks and foot- 
ball and two tests in a row and a knock 




on the door. There is an "awesome" 
party Friday night and bloody Marys be- 
fore the game and sometimes when a lit- 
tle drunk there is a sad moment in the 
bathroom when the empty void returns; 
there is a moment cramming for the 
chemistry mid-term when a supreme 
commitment settles about the room and 
cheerfully rustles the pages of a well- 
worn notebook. He is too busy studying 
to notice, but he is happy. 

There is no revelation-filled instan- 
taneous flash when the bricks and green 
lawns become home but there it is, and 
he is here. And they've borrowed his 
soap again two doors down, but he is 
happy. 

Does it take a special kind of student 
to be happy at Hampden-Sydney? Yes, I 
believe it takes a junior with a 3.15 GPA 
who likes Boz Scaggs and drives a Fer- 
rari. I believe it takes a senior pre-med 
major with parents in Charlottesville and 
a girlfriend at Hollins. I believe it takes a 
freshman in Cushing who is friends with 
the janitor. 

And as the daily events and non- 
events blur by, interrupted by nothing 
very good or very bad, the substance of 
which our lives become, the junior- 
turned-senior looks back on his college 
self and sees a man who was close to a 
great many people. Perhaps he still 
doesn't like Bill Deal and the Rhondells; 
perhaps he never will make an A in Rus- 



sian history, even if he interviews every 
Czar; perhaps his money went for beer 
and was not given to the poor. But as a 
freshman he still knew where Morton 
Hall was, and he knew the joy of seeing 
his friends again. 

But what must he really think, the man 
who gave four of his most important 
years to a small group of brick buildings 
scattered widely apart on some 500 acres 
in the middle of a rural county in South- 
side Virginia? Was he truly happy, sitting 
around a keg with his fellows three 
stories up in Cushing, many miles from 
even a movie theater? Perhaps it does 
take a special kind of student to be happy 
here . . . 

Actually it takes two. The student who 
tailored his choice of colleges to suit his 
tastes, and the student who has tailored 
his tastes to suit his choice of colleges. 
Chameleons that we are, we can make 
ourselves a home here if it were not that 
way when we arrived. Some Hampden- 
Sydney men, I believe, were Hampden- 
Sydney men upon their arrival and 
parked their BMWs beside a new place 
which was already old and familiar. 
Others have re-shaped themselves. 



squeezed a bit here and there, to fit in but 
they too found a home. And without any 
real difficulty it is as Hampden-Sydney 
men that we all shall leave, treading new 
paths but always carrying with us a 
chunk of what was home just as surely as 
if the Watkins Bell Tower were imbed- 
ded on our foreheads. 

And we'll always know we got off 
easy, because many college students 
who graduate must carry with them an 
almalmagation of steel buildings and 
steely stares and steel impersonel filing 
cabinets, acres and acres of steel, and 
the load is too much. They can never 
carry such a large school with them and 
so they select a floor of a building, or a 
remembered face or two, to bring with 
them the remainder of their lives. We are 
fortunate here, to have so little to take 
away and yet so much. 

Without trying to speak for every indi- 
vidual student, I think that we must be 
happy here. We must be content, to 
enjoy living so far away from women and 
civilization. "Simplify, simplify, 
simplify!" said Thoreau, and without 
going as far as Walden Pond, I think we 
have achieved that goal. Take away 



women and civilization and you have 
smoothed out your life; placing those 
elements at arm's length, where they can 
be recalled at your convenience and not 
at theirs, is a good way to spend four 
years of a life easier than you will ever 
find again. Before we are done, we will 
surely have our share of women and 
civilization. 

But today we have our books and we 
have our friends. Sometimes we have to 
forsake one for the other (so be it, 
neither is going anywhere). Sometimes 
we feel lost with one or the other (and so 
men everywhere cannot always be cer- 
tain of their path). It is the rare student, 
though, who does not regain his bearings 
and it is the rarer student still who gets 
lost between his dorm and Eggleston lib- 
rary. And if ever we do find him, lying in 
state in newmown grass after wearing in 
it endless circles, I am sure he will still 
have a smile on his face. For he did not 
die of women, and he did not die of 
civilization. 

Ran Henry, class of 1979, was a Ralph McGill 
Fellow for 1977-78 and editor of the award- winning 
student newspaper. The Tiger . 




231 







ipm 




232 



&7l& (jAote& i& 9/aur& 

"Hampden-Sydney is a traditional 
all-male, liberal arts college which st- 
rives for excellence." Any institution 
which fits this description would cer- 
tainly be a heaven on earth to all those 
persons who want to be associated with 
it. My interest is neither with what 
Hampden-Sydney was nor is but rather 
with what it will become in the future. 

With a perspective of only four years' 
residence at the college, I can address 
the following remarks with the insight of 
an understanding functionary but an 
emotional outsider. My question is 
whether the description given above will 
be reasonable ten years from now. There 
is a measurable probability that it will 
not. Indeed, based on the average rate of 
change in social institutions, it is practi- 
cally certain that no institution will be 
able to remain unchanged over a period 
of a decade. The risk of resisting change, 
or worse yet, of making the wrong 
changes is that in ten years the most ac- 
curate description of Hampden-Sydney 
College might well read as follows: 
"Hampden-Sydney is an old fashioned, 
sexist college which has an anachronistic 
and mediocre academic program." 

Which direction Hampden-Sydney 
will take is an open issue. It depends on 
decisions which must still be made, 
strategies still to be formed, messages 
still to be communicated, and programs 
still to be developed. In short, the future 
of the college, like the future of every in- 
stitution, depends on its strategic plan- 
ning and the quality of the implementa- 
tion of those plans. 

Strategic planning involves setting ob- 
jectives in various areas and determining 
what must be done now to achieve those 
objectives at some specified time in the 
future. Prior to identifying specific be- 
havioral objectives, it is necessary to an- 
swer the following questions: 

1. What is the college now? 

2. What should the college be? 

3. What, in a general way, must be 
done to close the gap between what 
Hampden-Sydney is and what it 
should be? Closing the gap involves 
more than few well written 
speeches and glib remarks. 

Upon my arrival at Hampden-Sydney 
four years ago the most frequent topic of 
casual conversation was the lack of lead- 



ership at the college. The same topic 
continues to have a wide currency today. 
My own interpretation is that this per- 
ceived lack of leadership stems from a 
lack of vision in establishing and com- 
municating a strategic planning process 
for the college. Against this background 
it is evident that the first priority should 
be a serious effort to reach a consensus 
in the community as to the long range 
goals and plans for the college. 

What is The College Now? 

Reflecting the first sentence of this 
essay the college can be described in four 
ways: 1) traditional, 2) all-male, 3) liberal 
arts, 4) excellent. 

What does it mean to have tradition or 
to be traditional? Is a traditional educa- 
tional program simply a program which 
was appropriate in an earlier age, and if 
so, is it now relevant or useful to any- 
one? Does tradition mean a blind adher- 
ence to past practice or does tradition 
imply a bedrock foundation upon which 
to build? Perhaps having a tradition is a 
mixed blessing. Tradition might con- 
strain and obscure future courses of 
action. 

Hampden-Sydney is an all-male in- 
stitution. What does that mean? There 
are at least seventy-five women con- 
nected with the college including em- 
ployees' and students' wives, secretaries, 
nurses, faculty members, middle manag- 
ers, exchange students, Longwood stu- 
dents, and other special students. The 
college is not now and probably never 
was an all-male institution. It is true that 
almost all "regular" students are men. 
Why should this be so? Is there some ad- 
vantage to single-sex education, and, if 
so, is that the reason for being all male? 
There are disadvantages to remaining a 
primarily male institution. Since one's 
perception of women is developed in part 
by the quality and quantity of contact, 
perhaps Greek Weekend, nights in the 
dorm, and weekends at Sweet Briar are 
less useful for the average student than 
would be daily breakfast, competition in 
a greek or accounting course, or mem- 
bership on committees, What of the 
young men who will be required to work 
as subordinates to women; will a view of 
women as sex objects or menials serve 
them well? The only well articulated rea- 



son for remaining all-male is that there 
appears to be a market for single-sex ed- 
ucation. 

Whether the maintenance of a unique 
market strategy is sufficient reason to 
exclude women as regular students is a 
question that must be left to others. It is 
enough to point out that there are very 
real educational costs to that stretegy. 

Liberal arts seems to mean whatever 
we want it to mean. While there is the 
appearance of broad-ranging agreement 
on the meaning of liberal arts, this appa- 
rent agreement collapses on most spe- 
cific questions. Between students and 
faculty there is practically no discussion 
on this subject. Among the faculty the 
range of difference is so great that a 
common ground is virtually impossible 
to find. 

I believe that the confusion about the 
liberal arts arises from a fundamental 
misconception. At Hampden-Sydney, 
education — and consequently the lib- 
eral arts — is defined in terms of curricu- 
lum, courses, and professors rather than 
in terms of values, ideals, and analytical 
skills. Eventually, those values, ideals, 
and analytical skills which constitute the 
substance of an "education" must be 
identified. But as long as the discussion 
centers on who can teach English com- 
positon and whether sociology, business, 
anthropology, or the performing arts are 
"proper" subjects, no progress can be 
made. 

The final characteristic of Hampden- 
Sydney is that it strives for excellence. 
To be excellent means to be first class, 
superior, or eminently good. In what 
way is Hampden-Sydney striving to be 
first class? Perhaps excellence would be 
achieved with intellectual distinction, 
good citizenship, affability, is some 
combination of these. Should you 
maximize or optimize? Are the faculty 
and students willing to live the hard life 
of serious intellectual activity? Should 
they be willing? Are the faculty striving 
for excellence in teaching or research? 
What should students and faculty to do 
to become excellent? No one seems to 
know. So, in what sense is Hampden- 
Sydney striving for excellence? Perhaps 
the sum is greater than the parts. If so, 
there must be some observable outcome 
which can be described as excellent. To 
date, no one has been able to tell me 
what to look for to see either excellence 
or a striving for excellence. 

So where is the college? At present 
there is a healthy tradition but the college 
probably is not and should not be tradi- 



234 



tional. The all-male designation is more a 
public relations scheme than a reality. 
Whether the liberal arts exist at 
Hampden-Sydney is more of a defini- 
tional than substantive question. Cer- 
tainly there is no agreement here on what 
the liberal arts are. Finally, excellence is 
at best an elusive notion. 

Do not be discouraged by this assess- 
ment. There is nothing sacred about 
being traditional, inherently healthy 
about being all-male, superior about lib- 
eral arts, or inevitable about being excel- 
lent. 

What Should the College Be? 

Over the time span I have in mind (i.e., 
about a decade) the college can become 
almost anything it chooses. Almost any- 
thing excludes however certain things. 
The college probably cannot be all-male 
even if it maintains the present minimal 
involvement of women. The college 
probably cannot become excellent, but 
great improvements in student, faculty, 
and administrative performance are pos- 
sible. 

What the college can do is continue to 
build, modernize, and develop within the 
best of the traditional ideals of 
Hampden-Sydney. This is not going to 
be an easy task. To work with the best 
traditions requires that the inferior or 
outmoded ones be discarded. Someone 
must decide which are useful and which 
are useless. Who will perform this task? 

If the direction of the college is to be 
goal-oriented and well-directed in the fu- 
ture, then objectives must be established 
in a whole range of areas. Consider these 
aspects of college activity: 

— Faculty development 

— Expected student performance 

— Alumni relations 

— Physical facilities 

— Business affairs 

— Fund-raising 

— Community cultural development 

— Fraternity activities 

— Academic program 

— Athletics 

— Student recruiting 

Each of these activities — and probably 
many more — must be thought through 
clearly. Who is to perform this gargan- 
tuan task? When will it be done? How 
can the community be involved? A ra- 
tional attempt to understand each of 
these areas is absolutely essential. The 
time to do it is now, not later. 

Do not be concerned that all these 
things must be done. The leadership in 
every institution should be addressing is- 



sues like these on a continuing basis. 
What ought to be a concern is that at 
Hampden-Sydney no one seems to ac- 
cept responsibility in many of these 
areas. 

As a suggestion of the type of analysis 
required, consider the following observa- 
tions on the liberal arts as a basis for 
further development of the academic 
program. The following comments do 
not necessarily form either the correct or 
the only plausible assessment possible. 
What is intended is an outline of one of 
several plausible assessments of the lib- 
eral arts: 

The Liberal Arts 

Liberal means free, and the objective 
of liberal education ought to be to free 
outselves from our narrow experiences. 
Such a study ought to have as its major 
objective an understanding of the en- 
vironmental forces in the world. This 
understanding facilitates our efforts to 
maximize our own well-being and that of 
the community as a whole. The en- 
vironmental forces which constantly in- 
fluence mankind seem to be of five 
types: biological, psychological, material 
culture, non-material culture, and natu- 
ral resources. These five forces encircle 
the individual and at the same time direct 
and constrain his activity. The direction 
and constraint are not completely limit- 
ing, because the individual has the capac- 
ity to change the very structure of the 
environment. 

My own view is that a liberal arts edu- 
cation should include the study of these 
five environmental forces within a histor- 
ical context. Structuring a program of 
study is largely a matter of fixing the re- 
lative emphasis on the five environmen- 
tal forces. The natural sciences emphasis 
biological and natural resources while 
the humanities are almost entirely li- 
mited to the non-material culture. A 
serious study of the material culture 
could include architecture, engineering, 
sculpture, and computer technology. 
Business administration tends to be most 
interested in, but not limited to, the 
psychological and material culture. 

It should be apparent that the critical 
matter in understanding the liberal arts is 
not the name of the subject so much as 
the approach. As long as the objective is 
understanding the world, the mechanism 
is relatively unimportant. So a wide 
range of approaches should be consistent 
with truly liberal education. Hampden- 
Sydney has tended to encourage studies 
in the natural sciences and humanities to 



the denigration of the social sciences. 
This is of course acceptable as long as it 
is realized that this strategy leaves gaps 
in a proper "liberal" understanding of 
the world. 

The Summing Up 

This essay began with the ideal public 
relations statement about Hampden- 
Sydney. It was observed that, in fact, 
this statement is not a realistic view of 
the present status of the college. 

A reasonable future can be con- 
structed on the best of past tradition and 
oriented toward rational, attainable go- 
als. Such a future is plausible in an envi- 
ronment of limited resources only if 
leadership is provided in the strategic 
planning process. Strategic planning de- 
pends on knowing where you are, where 
you want to go, and how you intend to 
get there. To know these three things in a 
functional way is a time-consuming and 
difficult task. 

The final questions are whether the re- 
quisite leadership is available and 
whether the effort will be forthcoming? 
The answer to both of these questions is 
yes, but . . . Yes, the leadership is 
available in an abstract sense. However, 
even the best potential leader needs fol- 
lowers. Whatever lack there has been in 
leadership in the recent past has been 
exceeded by a lack of good followership. 
Followership requires that people be wil- 
ling to serve loyally and supportively by 
contributing constructive rather than 
obstructive criticism. Being a follower 
presupposes that there will be a leader to 
follow. I believe that the necessary lead- 
ers and followers are in place at 
Hampden-Sydney. If I am correct, then 
all that is needed is performance from 
both groups. 

Recognition of the need for perfor- 
mance will lead to stragic planning fol- 
lowed by implementation. Then 
Hampden-Sydney will become whatever 
is wanted. A lack of performance will 
lead to the inevitable result: 
"Hampden-Sydney will become an old 
fashioned, sexist college with an anac- 
hronistic and mediocre academic educa- 
tion." 

The choice is yours but the options are 
clear. 



Dr. Francis J. Spreng was an Assistant Professor 
of Economics and Management at 
Hampden-Sydney College during the 1977-78 
school year. 



235 



\ 



« 




&~Aoma& <SAomch 

Too much is made of the supposed "unreality" 
of the academic community. Historically, the uni- 
versity — like the church — has been protected 
from the control and intrusions of the civil au- 
thorities. This protection for centuries has allowed 
the free exchange of ideas and unrestricted de- 
velopment of the human intellect. The greater the 
isolation from the "real" world, the greater the op- 
portunity for uninterrupted pursuit of learning for 
its own sake. It was in the isolated monasteries of 
the middle ages that survived the basis of the prac- 
tical knowledge of the Renaissance. 

Because students will not enthusiastically accept 
the life of scholarly monks, they have forced col- 
leges and universities to set aside social isolation 
and become "involved". Students want to be 
taught to solve social dilemna, to understand politi- 
cal systems, to rear children, to invest their 
portfolio, and to play a good game of tennis. The 
demand is not only for academic credit for the ac- 
quisition of practical knowledge but for concurrent 
experimental learning. What is usually overlooked 
by most students is that if one is possessed of a 
well-developed intellect — the goal of the liberal 
arts — a knowledge of the particulars is unimpor- 
tant, and most "experimental learning" is just so 
much make believe. It is for this reason that the lib- 
eral — the liberating — arts shall always be impor- 
tant in a free society. The degree of importance is 
directly related to the value the society places upon 
individuality, truth, and beauty. If a liberal arts ed- 
ucation is not "marketable" today, that is a sad 
commentary on our society. The College does not 
strive to teach men to "muddle through" but at- 
tempts to educate innovators and progressive think- 
ers who will refuse to accept mediocrity and pro- 
vide the impetus for positive change. 

Hampden-Sydney has attempted to retain much 
of the isolation of a traditional academic communi- 
ty, and I do not believe that to be detremental to 
the educational program. The location of the col- 
lege is ideal for the student — although it can be 



hard at times on those of us who live here year 
round. It is true that students at urban universities 
have access to museums, gallery s, and theatres, 
but those students who take advantage of such at- 
tractions are few. It is true that larger and more 
heavily endowed colleges have better facilities than 
Hampden-Sydney; this may be inconvenient to 
students but not a handicap. There is more than 
enough at this college to learn and to experience 
than most of our students can absorb in four years. 
The great tragedy is that too many students spend a 
significant portion of their four years at 
Hampden-Sydney somewhere else in pursuit of 
women, beer, and amusement. When it is all over, 
much of the opportunity for a unique experience is 
lost. And this is a unique experience — here is 
beauty, honesty, friendship, tranquility — time to 
think, to reflect, to consider. Because it is unique, 
comparison with other colleges and universities is 
pointless. There is much we can learn from others, 
but others can learn from us: there are innovations 
and improvements to be made, but the basic ex- 
perience here is singularly ours and must be pro- 
tected from others and occasionally from ourse- 
lves. 

The typical Hampden-Sydney student does not 
really understand what he has here. He usually en- 
joys the experience — some, too few, appreciate 
the opportunity — but it is not until you arrive in 
the "real" world that you understand. The young 
men who are really happy at Hampden-Sydney are 
those who do appreciate and take in all that this en- 
vironment and educational experience have to of- 
fer. They are intelligent, thoughtful, and honest 
with themselves and others. The rest are amused, 
not happy. 

Without complacence and with a constant desire 
to improve, we can nevertheless take a certain 
pride in what we are. Seniors will remember their 
years here with pride and affection. Under- 
classmen should savor these days: they will not 
come again. 

Mr. Thomas H. Shomo was the acting Dean of Students and the Director 
of Financial Aid at Hampden-Sydney College during the 1977-78 academic 
year. Mr. Shomo is an alumnus of the college, graduating in the class of 1969. 



238 



Weu^ £/rom/ (A& 5^A 



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(a/? Q8(//it//iy, ^9^ 



I want to tell you that nothing in my life has made me as 
proud as the opportunity to serve this grand old college. To 
return to Virginia to live and work in a small college is a 
dream I have cherished for many years. I seek your support, I 
ask for your patience — for I have much to learn — I solicit 
your criticism, knowing that it will be excited by your abiding 
love of Hampden-Sydney and your fierce loyalty to the Col- 
lege — and I shall hope to earn your friendship. We are going 
to have a great year together, and I hope you will forgive my 
quoting a famous and controversial southern gentleman, an 
American president, in saying "You can depend on it." We 
are going to work hard, we are going to play hard . . . we are 
going to squeeze our lives here like a sponge. 

. . . I want to talk for a little while about two things: vision 
and tolerance. There is a text in the Old Testament which is 
fitting to our purpose: "Behold, here cometh the dreamer / 
Let us slay him / We will see what happens to his dream." I 
hope each of you has a dream — a vision — and I hope every 
one of you understands that this College lives to help you 
begin the long process toward the realization of that vision. 
Moreover, Hampden-Sydney exists to assure that in the pur- 
suit of that dream each of you shall be granted the nurture, 
the understanding, and the active tolerance of the rest of us as 
you prepare yourselves for your lives after you leave us. Let 
the dreamer work out his vision for himself, let the rest of us 
work to assure he can do this, and let him live to see his 
dream fulfilled. 

A small college is a community of learners and teachers, 
and a community is simply a unit of society in which the ac- 
tions of each somehow touch and influence those of all. We do 
not work in isolation from each other. The dreamer must 
guard his private vision but he must understand that the most 
reclusive scholar on this campus is a member of the college: 
his contributions to the tone of life at Hampden-Sydney are as 
vital to our enterprise as those of its most involved members. 

Yet I urge all of you to listen to your own drummers, to re- 
sist the pressure of habit, fashion, custom — when those 
pressures combine (as they often do in small communities) to 
steal you from your private dreams, and to thwart them. I ask 
you always to work to distinguish what is fundamental to 
your fulfillment as scholars and men from what is superficial, 
and eccentric to that fulfillment. At the same time, I remind 
you that education is part of life, not preparation for life; that 
life, as someone said, is too often something that happens 
while you are making plans; and that, finally, as the poet Bion 
said, when small boys throw rocks at frogs they do so in 
sport; but when the frogs die, it is in earnest. Let your lives 
here be full and rich and happy; do not let the muderous, and 
usually self-imposed, pressures of ambition thwart your de- 
sires for solitude, regeneration, and calm. Above all. cherish 
and learn to admire him whose instincts and interests are al- 
together different from your own. You may feel some unbid- 
den impulse to make sport of him, but when the thin flame of 
his dream goes out, it goes out in earnest. 

You are in college for two reasons. To learn to think better, 
and to learn to live productively in a community. Should you 
succeed in both, and I believe you will, you will be prepared 
for your professional lives — as doctors and ministers and 



business men, diplomats and attorneys, artists, architects, 
and scholars. These will be the lives of service to other com- 
munities: Lives in which you welcome and discharge your re- 
sponsibilities as gentlemen, lives which are happy and ful- 
filled. 

To say that you are in college to learn to think better is 
perhaps a tart, bitten-off way of expressing a fundamental 
purpose of education. It is the presumption of those who 
work to educate others that those they guide are capable of 
learning. It is the presumption of those who teach in a college 
dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in liberal studies that 
those studies have a time-worn and proved fitness for prepar- 
ing their students to think better: by this we mean nothing 
more than that you learn to assemble evidence patiently and 
thoroughly before you make decisions and judgements; that 
you learn courageously to uphold those decisions and judge- 
ments; that you be prepared to argue them eloquently; that 
your minds be free of prejudice; that you learn to appreciate 
arguments and points-of-view opposed to your own, for in 
them is often more truth than in your own; and that you will 
esteem both the lifelong cultivation of mind and the gift of 
that mind, and the character that sustains it, and the willing- 
ness to place these at the service of others, as your highest 
calling; finally that the heart has its reasons which the mind 
cannot comprehend. 

. . . I want you to be as proud of this College as it is possi- 
ble to be proud of anything, and I want your pride to be a liv- 
ing force which informs your work and your leisure when you 
are here and when you are home. Quite incidentally, it is this 
as much as anything which is going to bring to our campus 
succeeding generations of Hampden-Sydney students. Charac- 
ter will continue to be a principle criterion of selection and 
admission to the College — a criterion, in my view — worth 
all the College Board tests ever prepared or administered by 
some crackpot in Princeton; and character will continue to be 
a principle criterion of success for those admitted as students. 

Your experience here should be bracing, but it should not 
be icy. It is a truism that education largely fulfills its purposes 
by indirection; that the nights you spend together talking, 
your experience at parties, your participation in sport — that 
from these things you will often learn things as valuable as 
those you learn in the classroom and indeed out of books. 
"Books," said Emerson, "are for the scholar's idle hours." 
Do not take Emerson too seriously, and certainly do not 
wrench his sentence utterly out of context, but think about 
that. 

. . . Finally, let us affirm . . . our pride in the College, our 
pleasure in this reassembly of our scattered members, and 
our determination to make the new year — our two-hundreth 
and second — a year whose enterprise and success will be 
worthy of vision, the unthwarted dream, of those who lived 
and worked here in the College's first year. We are strong, we 
are bound together in a common purpose, guided by princi- 
ples we hold in common. 

Josiah Bunting, III is the thirtieth President of Hampden-Sydney College. 
He will be inaugurated as such in the Fall of 1978. The above article is a 
reprint of excerpts of his Opening Convocation speech. 



239 



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OLfe Vfli 



240 



(9/1/ Jfflhenz/ (Sc/ucatlcmy 




The governing principle of un- 
dergraduate education must be 
distinguished from the governing 
principle of graduate education. 
Graduate education aims at pro- 
viding excellence through 
specialization. That specialization 
is dependent upon a proper educa- 
tional foundation. This prepara- 
tory course of study, undergradu- 
ate education, will have hopefully 
provided guidance for what is 
truly important and worthy ad- 
vanced study. Yet undergraduate 
education is more than simply a 
preparation for further profes- 
sional or graduate study, it is a 



liberal education in itself. 

Liberal education originally 
meant the education of free men 
and was intended to distinguish 
the free man from the enslaved 
man. The latter is unable to make 
proper choices since decisions are 
either impaired by birth or by lack 
of proper cultivation. Ultimately a 
liberal education is a preparation 
for assuming one's respon- 
sibilities as a man and as a citizen. 
One is personally responsible for 
guiding himself while publicly, as 
a citizen, he must rule and be 
ruled in turn. The fulfillment of 
personal and public duties re- 



242 



quires the making of proper 
choices, and this is dependent in 
turn upon the development of 
man's moral and intellectual 
faculties which are involved in de- 
liberation. When deliberating on 
future courses of action, whether 
private or public, men must con- 
front accepted opinions and judge 
their merits. In such deliberations 
the liberally educated man does 
not slavishly follow popular opin- 
ion, but attempts to determine the 
true course. The goal is to replace 
opinion with truth. Yet such 
knowledge probably is inaccessi- 
ble. A more sober expectation is 
to anticipate an ascent from opin- 
ion to perfected but still imperfect 
understanding. 

The practical need for a liberal 
education is as applicable today as 
for earlier generations. Democ- 
racy rests on the principle that all 
men have an equal opportunity to 
express their preferences on can- 
didates or policies as reflected in 
the principle of "one man — one 
vote". The workings of democ- 
racy then reflect the wisdom or 
lack of wisdom of such prefer- 
ences. Poor leadership and the 
choice of poor policy results in de- 
fective government while en- 
lightened leadership and wise pol- 
icy results in proper government. 
A democracy, consequently, is 
dependent for its well-being upon 
the ability of its citizens to choose 
wisely, and this is dependent upon 
education. 

Benefits to the individual from a 
liberal education are far greater 
than the potential economic and 
material rewards accompanying a 



degree. Even these benefits must 
be managed and directed toward a 
higher end. Confronted with the 
choice of many objectives in life, 
an individual must have some ap- 
preciation of the worthwhileness 
of each so that he can be dis- 
criminating in the exercise of his 
energy and resources. What is re- 
quired is a standard or a means by 
which one can measure the impor- 
tance of events, people, objec- 
tives, and desires. 

Most people entering a univer- 
sity have not been exposed to a 
variety of claims of religion, phi- 
losophy, and the city. Among 
serious men of previous genera- 
tions, the most compelling ques- 
tion was to resolve or at least un- 
derstand the competing claims as 
to the proper way of life. The pur- 
pose of liberal education is not to 
settle the issue nor to indoctrinate 
the student, but to identify the dif- 
ferent perspectives on these ques- 
tions. In the twentieth century, 
the task is further complicated by 
the modern contention that all 
ways of life are equal; or that if 
they are not equal, the task of dis- 
tinguishing the higher from the 
lower is impossible as this in- 
volves a question of "value" and 
not of "fact". Relativism and his- 
toricism of the twentieth century 
must also be given its proper hear- 
ing. 

To characterize liberal educa- 
tion as the presentation and eluci- 
dation of the fundamental princi- 
ples of man and the universe is to 
remind us that such principles and 
their pursuit trancend any specific 
discipline within a university. The 



departmentalization of the 
academy is a reflection of 
specialization or the concentra- 
tion on a part of what is to be 
studied. Yet each of the discip- 
lines through the assumptions 
which define and guide it makes a 
statement as to the proper in- 
terpretation of responsibility of 
the university or college to 
examine the adequacy of these as- 
sumptions. 

A curriculum must be designed 
to emphasize the unity of know- 
ledge, in contrast to the increased 
specialization and division char- 
acteristic of most undergraduate 
programs. Through careful study 
of the highest statements concern- 
ing the first principles of things in 
the proper life for man, the stu- 
dent is exposed to the assump- 
tions and substance of their argu- 
ments. The writings of Plato, 
Aristotle, the Bible, Bacon, 
Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, 
Adam Smith, Rousseau, Newton, 
Hegel, Nietzsche, Freud, and 
Marx, to mention only a few, con- 
tain profound reflections on the 
permanent questions. Moreover, 
the authors of these Great Books 
are also the founders of the mod- 
ern disciplines. An undergraduate 
program emphasizing the impor- 
tance of permanent questions 
common to all disciplines can 
utilize the specialized training of 
its faculty. 

Dr. Joseph E. Goldberg is an Assistant Professor 
of Government and Foreign Affairs at 
Hampden-Sydney_. He is the 1978 recipient of The 
Cabell Award for outstanding teaching. 



243 




244 







245 



(§o//e^& and Work: ^rtdjUncp STcoo- Wor/ds/ 

f^&i/ o^e/i/ /etter tchjprac/uati/uy &esuor&) 



(Rich (JBermer 

On May 14 you graduate from 
Hampden-Sydney. For many of you this 
is a time of reminiscence and nostalgia 
(already you're thinking like an alum- 
nus!). For many it is a time of anticipa- 
tion and challenge as you look forward to 
desired career or graduate school goals. 
For others in your class, May 14 signals 
an anxious period in your life as you re- 
luctantly confront the unknown, and 
even unwelcome future. 

For all of you in the Class of 1978, 
however, graduation marks a transition. 
Yet May 14, 1978 is not a date that sepa- 
rates your life into two distinct worlds of 
college and work. What you have ex- 
perienced at Hampden-Sydney will be 
forever connected to your future careers 
and lives. I would like to share with you 
some thoughts about life / career plan- 
ning and why I feel that your Hampden- 
Sydney experience will serve you well. 

Many of you (and your parents) are 
concerned about your futures. Among 
the comments I hear from students and 
parents: 

"I've hear liberal arts graduates can't 
get good jobs." 

"We've spent $25,000 putting you 
through college. We're counting on you 
to show us this money wasn't wasted." 

"You need to find one good career 
field and stay with it. We don't want you 
job-hopping." 

"I went to a liberal arts college for four 
years — what do I have to offer an em- 
ployer?" 

In short, how can a member of the 
Class of 1978 effectively connect these 
"two separate worlds" — Hampden- 
Sydney College and the world of work? 

First, let me offer statistics to dispell a 
few misconceptions. If you are typical of 
most American 21-year-olds, you will 
(according to the U.S. Department of 
Labor) change jobs 8-12 times during 
your working lifetime. You will also 
change career fields 3-5 times. In addi- 
tion, there currently exist in this country 



close to 30,000 different job titles. These 
figures suggest that you are living. in a 
world in which change is a constant (only 
a liberal arts graduate could write that 
sentence). 

Are you as a liberal arts graduate 
equipped to meet this world of change? 
Yes, I feel you are uniquely prepared, 
and this opinion is shared by alumni, 
employers, and leaders. 

Last year's H-SC seniors represent a 
good example of how these "two sepa- 
rate worlds" can be connected. Fifty- 
one percent (51%) of the 128 respondents 
to our survey are in graduate school, 
preparing for various vocations. In- 
cluded in this group are students in med- 
ical, dental, and pharmacy school (16); 
law school (15); business school (8); and 
graduate psychology programs (8). Also 
many students in last year's senior class 
landed jobs in business, including insur- 
ance (6), sales (6), banking (5), manage- 
ment trainees (3), and real estate (2). 
Five are teaching. 

Among the job titles claimed by the 
class of 1977 are appraiser, hospital ad- 
ministrative intern, legal assistant, sales 
manager, stock broker, math teacher, 
mental health worker, insurance agent, 
bank trainee, and instructor for retarded 
adults. 

Over the years, Hampden-Sydney 
graduates have enjoyed similar career 
success in the fileds of law, medicine, 
business, and education. Furthermore, 
many of these alumni link their occupa- 
tional success to Hampden-Sydney's lib- 
eral arts education. Following are repre- 
sentative comments from a recent alumni 
survey asking "How has you experience 
at H-SC helped prepare you for your 
work?" 

"I learned how to get along with all 
types of people" (James S. Shelton '63, 
Economics / Government and Foreign 
Affairs, Business Manager). 

"By learning how to discipline myself 
and set goals" (John Middleton '76. His- 



tory, Life Insurance). 

"The broad-based academic and 
cultural-philosophical background was a 
good foundation for MCV" (J.C. Buston 
'58, Biology / Chemistry, Physician). 

"The atmosphere and living condi- 
tions at Hampden-Sydney make you 
flexible" (J. P. McGuire Boyd '64, Math, 
Municipal Bond Trader). 

"Ability to handle the English lan- 
guage and think logically" (Richard 
Manson '65, History/Government and 
Foreign Affairs, Attorney). 

"Hampden-Sydney instills in a person 
a code of conduct that he carries into the 
business world" (R. Stedman Oakley, Jr. 
'66, President, home furnishings compa- 
ny). 

"The liberal arts education and envi- 
ronment at Hampden-Sydney laid a 
foundation for me to become a business 
leader. In my experiences I have seen a 
number of very capable and bright peo- 
ple with specialized educational 
backgrounds fail in leadership roles. 
Hampden-Sydney's tradition of excel- 
lence certainly has its impact on me" 
(Norwood H. Davis, Jr. '63, Executive 
Vice President, Blue Cross of Virginia). 

The positive link between an under- 
graduate liberal arts experience and the 
world of work is further articulated by 
leading U.S. executives. When these 
leaders were asked to list qualities they 
seek in a business executive, narrow vo- 
cational skills were conspicuously absent 
from their responses: 

"Honesty, candor, good judgement, 
intelligence, imagination, and the ability 
to write clear, concise memos. I also 
want team players" (Henry Ford, 
Chairman, Ford Motor Company). 

"A conceptual person, one who seeks 
to bring new approaches to problem- 
solving, as opposed to a consensus indi- 
vidual who goes to more traditional 
sources for answers" (J. Paul Stricht, 
President, R.J. Reynolds Industries). 

"I look for an individual with broad in- 



246 




terests. Great changes are taking place 
around us and a broad, emcompassing 
overview is more pertinent today than 
narrow specialization" (C. Peter 
McColough, Chairman, Xerox Corpora- 
tion). 

The skills and qualities cited above 
certainly cannot be guaranteed by a 
H-SC liberal arts education. What can be 
guaranteed is exposure to these qualities 
through four years of life in an environ- 
ment that promotes and supports these 
broad-based transferable skills. Learning 



sites for these skills might include the 
philosophy classroom (problem-solving 
skills), the Tiger (writing skills), the la- 
crosse field (team work), the fire de- 
partment (working under pressure), the 
fraternity (tolerance for the views of 
others), or the science laboratory (inves- 
tigative skills). 

In a sense, then, each of you has ex- 
perienced at Hampden-Sydney every- 
thing you will do. You have analyzed, 
led, planned and organized, concep- 
tualized, listened, communicated, writ- 



ten, persuaded, worked independently 
and as part of a team, worked under 
pressure of deadlines, created, combined 
ideas with manipulative skills, reasoned 
numerically, developed and im- 
plemented goals, served others, iden- 
tified and acted out moral issues, and 
made decisions. 

You have performed these skills 
through your academic program, extra- 
curricular activities, summer jobs, vol- 
unteer experiences, and hobbies. Those 
activities you enjoyed and in which you 
performed well may in fact be leading 
you down a particular career path. 
Knowing which of the liberal arts skills 
you have acquired and which you enjoy 
is an important first step in implementing 
an effective career choice. 

All this is fine, you may say, but how 
do you find that first job? Isn't being a 
liberal arts graduate a handicap? Yes, to 
a certain extent this is true. You may 
have more problems landing your first 
job than your counterpart with more 
specialized training (e.g. the accountant, 
engineer, or computer expert). You will, 
to be sure, have to sell yourself and your 
skills to the employer, and the burden 
will be on you to demonstrate how your 
liberal arts background will match the 
employer's needs. Despite this initial dif- 
ficulty, most national studies indicate 
that the liberal arts graduates wind up 
being better satisfied with their lives and 
often better paid. Over the long run 
(through 8-12 job changes), you will ben- 
efit greatly from your four years at 
Hampden-Sydney College. 

So savor the moment of your gradua- 
tion. Reflect fondly on your four years at 
Hampden-Sydney. Remember the fun, 
the hard work, the many challenges. 
And, as you face difficult career choices 
and job searches, remember the bridge 
that connects the promising world of 
your future with your Hampden-Sydney 
liberal arts education. 

Richard S. Benner is the Director of the Center 
for Counseling and Career Planning. His 
undergraduate studies were at Amherst College, a 
small liberal arts college in Amherst, Mass. 



247 




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The Past, the Present, and the 
Future of H-S Athletic Facilities 




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Location of the new field house 



264 











AN ATHLETIC CENTER FOR HAMPDEN -SYDNEY COLLEGE 

GLAVE NEWMAN ANDERSON & ASSOC - ARCHITECTS 10-20-77 



265 



Graduation 




266 



May 14, 1978 




267 






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• Winston-Salem 

HUNTER PUBLISHING COMPANY 

• North Carolina 
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FOR REFERENCE 
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CAYLORD 




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